Superconducting Magnetic Energy Storage (SMES)

In summary, the conversation revolves around SMES (Superconducting Magnetic Energy Storage) and its role in providing back-up power in the event of a power outage. The first question asks if SMES devices can be used as back-up batteries similar to generators, and the second question inquires about potential energy loss in the superconducting process. The third question asks if SMES devices require a ramp-up period to reach full capacity. The answer to the second question is that there is no energy loss, but refrigeration is required to maintain superconducting temperatures. The links provided offer more information about SMES technology.
  • #1
MattR
2
1
I cam across SMES (Superconducting Magnetic Energy Storage) while researching superconducting and had a few questions I'm hoping to have answered.

1. I have read that SMES devices are primary used in the event for short interruptions in power, and aiding in efficiency in the power grid. Can a SMES device be used like a back up battery in the event of a power outage similar to a back up generator kicking in? Considering some can hold MWH worth of energy I would think that if power went out the SMES device could kick in and provide the back up power needed until it was depleted or the power was restored.

2. Since SMES use superconducting in a way similar to an MRI (superconducting loop) to create a magnetic field to store energy do they loose any of that energy? If so, how much and over what time frame.

3. Do SMES devices need to be ramp-up, again similar to an MRI to reach a field strength or is that irreverent?

thanks for the help,
Matt R.
 
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  • #2
Welcome to PF Matt. We prefer it if you include a link to what you have been reading. Please post the link before we answer.
 
  • #3
MattR said:
Since SMES use superconducting in a way similar to an MRI (superconducting loop) to create a magnetic field to store energy do they loose any of that energy? If so, how much and over what time frame.
They do not lose energy; there is no resistance. However, it does require energy for the refrigeration to keep them at superconducting temperatures.
 
  • #4
anorlunda said:
Welcome to PF Matt. We prefer it if you include a link to what you have been reading. Please post the link before we answer.

Sure no problem.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Superconducting_magnet#Persistent_mode
Go down until persistent mode. The end of that paragraph reads:

"The winding current, and the magnetic field, will not actually persist forever, but will decay slowly according to a normal inductive (L/R) time constant:
H ( t ) = H 0 e − ( R / L ) t
where R is a small residual resistance in the superconducting wingdings due to joints or a phenomenon called flux motion resistance. Nearly all commercial superconducting magnets are equipped with persistent switches."

SMES links:
https://www.windpowerengineering.com/electrical/power-storage/say-hello-smes-superconducting-magnetic-energy-storage-system/
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Superconducting_magnetic_energy_storage
https://www.technologyreview.com/s/423227/superconducting-magnets-for-grid-scale-storage/
 
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What is Superconducting Magnetic Energy Storage (SMES)?

Superconducting Magnetic Energy Storage (SMES) is a type of energy storage system that uses superconducting materials to store electrical energy in the form of a magnetic field.

How does SMES work?

SMES works by passing an electrical current through a superconducting coil, which creates a magnetic field that stores the energy. When the stored energy is needed, the magnetic field is converted back into electrical energy.

What are the advantages of SMES?

Some advantages of SMES include its high energy density, fast response time, and ability to store and release energy repeatedly without significant degradation. It is also considered a more environmentally friendly energy storage option compared to traditional batteries.

What are the potential applications of SMES?

SMES has potential applications in various industries, including power grids, renewable energy systems, transportation, and aerospace. It can also be used for energy management in large buildings and industrial facilities.

What are the limitations of SMES?

One of the main limitations of SMES is its high cost, as the superconducting materials used are expensive. The cooling system required to maintain the superconducting state also adds to the cost. Additionally, the technology is still in its early stages and requires further research and development.

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