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Calculating flame temperature

  1. Aug 31, 2010 #1
    How could someone roughly calculate flame temperature? Lets say that a chemical reaction occurs at 1000F and the specific heat capacity of the reactants averages to 8 J/(mol x K). And the energy released in the reaction was 1000 KJ and the specific heat capacity of the products in 3 J/(mol x K). I really don't see anything else necessary to calculate flame temperature, but I could definitely be wrong. Is is a simple equation or does it require some hardcore computer program?
     
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  3. Aug 31, 2010 #2

    Borek

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    Staff: Mentor

    For a rough estimate heat balance should be sufficient. For a precise result there is nothing like an experiment. I guess engineers do have specialized formulas for such calculations.
     
  4. Aug 31, 2010 #3
    I only looking for a rough estimate. What do you mean by heat balance? How could it be used for a rough calculation?
     
  5. Sep 1, 2010 #4

    Borek

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    Staff: Mentor

    Last edited by a moderator: May 4, 2017
  6. Sep 1, 2010 #5
    It looks like you're after the adiabatic flame temperature, i.e. temperature with no heat transfer. As Borek stated you can determine the adiabatic flame temperature with a simple first law analysis within an accuracy of maybe 30%ish. To calculate a more realistic flame temperature you need to take into account variations in heat capacity, dissociation, radiative heat transfer, etc. This requires some complex code and I think some I think you can download for free. Of course the most accurate method is just to perform an experiment.
     
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