Calculating forces vectors etc?

In summary, The conversation pertains to calculating forces, particularly on guy wires A and B, when using side rope techniques to fell leaning trees. The force on each wire is dependent on various factors such as wind, ground conditions, tree weight, and lean. Using one rope, the required tension for rope A is 0.88T and for rope B is 1.5T. If two ropes are used, the analysis becomes more complex and requires methods from structural analysis.
  • #1
Ekka
11
0
Calculating forces ... vectors etc?

Hi all, I need to figure this out but I also need answers.

I'm a tree guy and our fields cross paths in many instances when coming to rigging forces.

In this diagram I have substituted a leaning tree for a steel beam which has a swivel under it so it can fall where-ever it wants.

I need to know what force would be on guy wire A or guy wire B ... don't worry about the other guy wires just make like the thing is perfectly balanced in the other planes.

The idea here is we use side rope techniques to fell leaners like that and it would be good to know what amount of force would be put on those side ropes. So besides getting a flat out answer which would be good I also would like to know how to work this out for future trees.

If this has already been explained somewhere etc I appologise for duplication and welcome your pleasant directions.
 

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  • #2
Ekka said:
I need to know "what force would be on guy wire A or guy wire B "... .


Does that mean only one of the guy wires will actually be attached or both of them?
 
  • #3
This is a structural analysis, which really can't be taught here. You can get a statics book and study how to conduct such an analysis.

Also, for your logging application there are many variables that will affect the answer, such as wind and ground conditions and the actual tree weight and lean.

For your example, and assuming only using one rope, rope A needs to be 0.88T, and rope B needs to be 1.5T. If you use two ropes, the analysis gets quite complicated.
 
  • #4
If the the tensions are not the same, then this is a hyperstatic problem of degree 1. You'll need to use other methods relying on the deflection and constitutive relations of the material. Look in any Structural Analysis book.
 

1. How do I calculate the net force on an object?

To calculate the net force on an object, you need to add up all the individual forces acting on the object. This can be done by using vector addition, where you break down each force into its horizontal and vertical components and then add them together. The resulting vector will be the net force.

2. What is the difference between a scalar and a vector quantity?

A scalar quantity has only magnitude, meaning it is described only by a numerical value. Examples include distance, time, and temperature. A vector quantity has both magnitude and direction, meaning it is described by both a numerical value and a direction. Examples include displacement, velocity, and force.

3. How do I calculate the force of gravity?

The force of gravity can be calculated using Newton's Law of Gravitation: F = G * (m1 * m2)/r^2, where G is the gravitational constant, m1 and m2 are the masses of the two objects, and r is the distance between them. This equation can be used to calculate the force of gravity between any two objects.

4. What is the difference between mass and weight?

Mass is a measure of the amount of matter in an object, while weight is a measure of the force of gravity acting on an object. Mass is constant, meaning it does not change depending on location, while weight can vary depending on the strength of gravity. Mass is measured in kilograms (kg), while weight is measured in Newtons (N).

5. How do I resolve a vector into its components?

To resolve a vector into its components, you can use trigonometry. If the vector is at an angle to the horizontal, you can use the sine and cosine functions to determine the horizontal and vertical components respectively. If the vector is at a 90 degree angle to the horizontal, the vertical component will be equal to the magnitude of the vector and the horizontal component will be zero.

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