Career Advice - Pre Med or Engineering?

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In summary, the junior in high school is considering a career in medicine or engineering. She is good at basic physics, but is intimidated by the responsibilities of a doctor. She is planning to take AP physics and AP biology next year in hopes of helping her make a choice. She is considering a career in finance, but is also interested in medicine.
  • #1
iceman99
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Hello I’m a junior in high school. I was just wondering if I could get some advice on careers. I am considering either a career in medicine, specifically radiology, or a career in engineering most likely electrical or chemical engineering. I am pretty good at this relatively basic physics and really enjoy it, which draws me towards the engineering field. However I also would like to go into medicine; I like helping people, and I cannot say money isn’t an attraction. I’m quite intimidated by the responsibilities of a doctor but I believe I will enjoy it in the end. Next year I’m planning on taking AP Physics and AP biology, in the hope that it will help me with my choice. College is drawing closer pre med or engineering; I would like any advice from anyone.
 
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  • #2
Well, there is bioengineering and chemical engineering in the pharmaceutical industry, developing new drugs and medicines, or producing them.

Radiology (used to be just X-ray) is just one of many diagnostic methods, which now includes MRI/PET/UT/. . . . .
 
  • #3
Yeah, my problem is that I do not know whether I want to have a career using physics; this year was a my first year taking the class, and i really liked it. Its been my life goal to go to med school and become a doctor but now I really do not know.
 
  • #4
How about considering medical physics? Medical physicist are specialized in applying physics to solve and advance medicine. You can work for radiology and radiation oncology department as a clinical physicist or become a professor at medical school.

http://www.aapm.org/
http://gray.mgh.harvard.edu/content/index.php?option=com_frontpage&Itemid=1
 
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  • #5
Thank you for the suggestions. I really enjoy physics but am better at math which engineering careers require the most math?
 
  • #6
If you are interested in math, have you considered something like quant finance? You can take a quantitative major such as math, engineering, stats, or physics plus some courses in commerce and compsci. Work hard and try to get into a reputable Financial Engineering graduate program. You would enter the work force 6 - 7 years after starting university (4 yrs ugrad + 2-3 yrs masters/internship). The salary is more than generous. This route is pretty hard but since you've set your eyes on things like Medicine and engineering, this would be something to consider as well.
 
  • #7
Seems pretty interesting ill have to look into that. What would I do with a masters in Financial Engineering?
 
  • #8
http://www.baruch.cuny.edu/math/masters_employment_stats_new.html

I've been told this is a pretty darn good school so obviously the placement rates are going to be high. I would not pay too much attention to that. Just scroll down to the Employers/Positions section to get an idea of what kind of jobs you can do. I'm sure you can search up more info if you spend some time on google.
 
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  • #9
Thank you for the link. I'll have to reasearch some of these careers.
 

Related to Career Advice - Pre Med or Engineering?

1. Should I choose pre-med or engineering as a career path?

The answer to this question ultimately depends on your personal interests, strengths, and career goals. Both fields have their own unique challenges and opportunities, so it's important to carefully consider which one aligns better with your skills and passions. It may also be helpful to speak with professionals in both fields and gain some hands-on experience through internships or shadowing to get a better understanding of what each career entails.

2. Which field has better job prospects and salary?

Both pre-med and engineering have strong job prospects and competitive salaries. However, the demand for engineers in industries such as technology, healthcare, and renewable energy is expected to grow significantly in the coming years. On the other hand, the healthcare industry is also growing and in need of medical professionals, especially with the aging population. Ultimately, your success in either field will depend on your dedication, skills, and experience.

3. Is one field more difficult than the other?

Both pre-med and engineering require a strong academic background and dedication to succeed. However, the level of difficulty may vary depending on your strengths and interests. For example, if you excel in math and science, engineering may come more naturally to you. On the other hand, if you have a passion for biology and helping others, pre-med may be a better fit. It's important to choose a field that challenges you, but also keeps you motivated and engaged.

4. Can I switch from pre-med to engineering (or vice versa) later on?

It is possible to switch from one field to the other, but it may require additional coursework and time. For example, if you decide to switch from pre-med to engineering, you may need to take some prerequisite math and science courses before applying to an engineering program. Similarly, if you switch from engineering to pre-med, you may need to take additional biology and chemistry courses. It's important to carefully consider your decision and consult with academic advisors to create a plan for switching fields.

5. What skills are important for success in pre-med or engineering?

Some important skills for success in pre-med include strong critical thinking and problem-solving abilities, attention to detail, and good communication skills. In engineering, important skills include analytical thinking, creativity, teamwork, and technical expertise. It's also important to have a strong work ethic, resilience, and a willingness to continuously learn and adapt in both fields.

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