Changing the direction of the acceleration Vector

In summary, two point charges, q1 = -25 microC and q2 = 50 microC, separated by a distance of 0.1m, create an electric field at point p which points to the left and has a magnitude of -6.3 x 10^8 N/C. Placing an electron at point p will result in the electron experiencing an acceleration vector pointing to the right, due to the negative charge of the electron. This can be seen from the force equation, which shows that the positive test charge feels a repulsive force outward from the point charge. However, due to the negative position from the net outward from the dominating positive, the r vector of force is negative, causing the electron to accelerate
  • #1
orthovector
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Homework Statement


2 point charges. q1 is -25 microC and q2 is 50 microC are separated by a distance of .1m where q1 is on a line that connects q1 to q2 and q1 is to the left of q2. point p is .02 m to the right of q1 and .8m to the left of q2.


Homework Equations



E = F/q

E(e) = Force on electron due to Electric Field

The Attempt at a Solution



okay, so the electric field at point p due to these 2 point charges is -6.3 E 8 N/C dot i.

if we put an electron at point p, the electron will feel an acceleration.

the electric field points to the left at point p. yet, the electron feels an acceleration vector pointing to the right. How do I switch the direction of the acceleration vector without multiplying a negative to the equation E(-e) = m(acc) where E = -6.3 E 8 N/C dot i ?
 
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  • #2
so? anybody with any ideas?
 
  • #3
Your Force equation is the product of the charge scalar and the E-field. Your e-Field at p is -x. But there is a - carried with the e. This reverses the acceleration that the charge will experience.
 
  • #4
there's got to be another way to switch the direction without multiplying by the negative scalar. If you look inside the Force equation...

f = q q k / r squared dot unit vector r. however, I'm not sure if the positive test charge feels a negative or positive force from the source.
 
  • #5
Positive test charge experiences positive force (repulsive force) outward from the point charge. The r vector of force is negative directed at that point as a result of the negative position from the net outward from the dominating positive. As a negative the electron however wants to accelerate opposite, i.e. toward the positive point, against the positive gradient, but of course only there and not beyond.
 

Related to Changing the direction of the acceleration Vector

1. How can the direction of the acceleration vector be changed?

The direction of the acceleration vector can be changed by applying a force in a different direction or by changing the mass or velocity of an object.

2. What factors affect the change in direction of the acceleration vector?

The factors that affect the change in direction of the acceleration vector include the magnitude and direction of the force applied, the mass and velocity of the object, and any external factors such as friction or air resistance.

3. Can the direction of the acceleration vector be changed without changing the magnitude?

No, according to Newton's Second Law of Motion, the acceleration of an object is directly proportional to the net force acting on it and inversely proportional to its mass. Therefore, in order to change the direction of the acceleration vector, the magnitude of the force must also change.

4. How does changing the direction of the acceleration vector affect an object's motion?

Changing the direction of the acceleration vector can cause an object to change its velocity, either by speeding up, slowing down, or changing direction. This change in velocity can lead to a change in the object's position and ultimately affect its motion.

5. Can the direction of the acceleration vector be changed constantly?

Yes, the direction of the acceleration vector can be changed constantly as long as a force is continuously applied. This is why objects in orbit, such as satellites, are constantly changing their acceleration vectors due to the continuous force of gravity from the Earth.

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