Circuit design: electron reverse-diffusion

In summary, Taylaron is looking for a material that will act like a powered diode, transferring electrons from one area of high concentration to another. He has come up with an old timey science project and an electrochemical technique, neither of which seem to fit the bill. He has also thought of using an induction principle to help with the transfer.
  • #1
taylaron
Gold Member
397
1
I'm looking for a material that acts like a powered diode. Where the material forces the electrons from from an area of low concentration of electrons to a high concentrated area.

Think of two tanks of water of the same size and water volume (representing two sources of static electricity), this material would act as a pump, forcing some if not all the water from one container into the other (forcing the electrons from one source to the other regardless of potential difference.)

This is against conventional circuit physics; but is there or can a material be made that encourages electrons to go from low to high concentrated environments?

Regards,

Taylaron
 
Engineering news on Phys.org
  • #2
Hmm, interesting. What do you have in mind for this?

I don't think any known material can do this b/c it's opposed to the laws of diffusion.
But I know of a way to make this happen using active circuitry.
 
  • #3
In an extremely simplified version of the component is similar to the description I gave above. I need to move some if not all of the static charge accumulated in an electroscope onto another electroscope at (orignally) the same potential using/ wasting as little energy as possible.
To my understanding, using a step-up transformer might work, but they are large, heavy and somewhat more complex that what I'm aiming for.
Thanks,

-Tay
 
  • #4
taylaron said:
In an extremely simplified version of the component is similar to the description I gave above. I need to move some if not all of the static charge accumulated in an electroscope onto another electroscope at (orignally) the same potential using/ wasting as little energy as possible.
To my understanding, using a step-up transformer might work, but they are large, heavy and somewhat more complex that what I'm aiming for.
Thanks,

-Tay

Cool, sounds like an old timey science project. Since you're dealing with static charge, I don't see how a step-up transformer could be used. They require AC currents and are galvanically isolated so no physical charge could be transferred.

My technique doesn't fit the bill either, it's best suited for electrochemical applications.

Have you thought of using additional conductors charged in such a way to encourage the charge transfer to happen as is needed (usually called "induction")? They might need to be moved mechanically, which requires energy but very little.
 

Related to Circuit design: electron reverse-diffusion

What is electron reverse-diffusion in circuit design?

Electron reverse-diffusion refers to the process in which an excess of electrons flows from the negative terminal to the positive terminal in a circuit, against the normal flow of current. This can cause issues such as overheating and damage to components.

How does electron reverse-diffusion occur in a circuit?

Electron reverse-diffusion can occur due to a variety of factors, including inadequate grounding, voltage spikes, and incorrect component placement. It can also occur in high-frequency circuits due to the skin effect.

What are the consequences of electron reverse-diffusion in circuit design?

The consequences of electron reverse-diffusion can include damage to components and circuitry, reduced performance, and potential safety hazards. It can also cause interference with other electronic devices.

How can electron reverse-diffusion be prevented in circuit design?

To prevent electron reverse-diffusion, proper grounding and shielding techniques should be used. It is also important to carefully design and layout the circuit to minimize voltage spikes and ensure proper component placement. Proper circuit analysis and testing can also help identify and prevent potential issues.

What measures can be taken to mitigate the effects of electron reverse-diffusion?

In some cases, adding additional components such as capacitors or inductors can help mitigate the effects of electron reverse-diffusion. Proper heat dissipation techniques can also help prevent overheating and damage to components. In high-frequency circuits, using conductive materials with low skin effect can also help reduce the effects of electron reverse-diffusion.

Similar threads

Replies
0
Views
527
  • Materials and Chemical Engineering
Replies
4
Views
4K
  • Materials and Chemical Engineering
Replies
6
Views
3K
Replies
12
Views
2K
  • Electromagnetism
Replies
2
Views
1K
  • Materials and Chemical Engineering
Replies
4
Views
1K
  • Electrical Engineering
Replies
22
Views
3K
Replies
21
Views
2K
  • Electrical Engineering
Replies
12
Views
1K
  • Engineering and Comp Sci Homework Help
Replies
5
Views
1K
Back
Top