Civ eng problem-volume of solid-simpsons rule

  • Thread starter debwaldy
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In summary, the conversation is about finding the area and volume of a solid pedestal in a tec graphics assignment. The person has already calculated the surface area but is confused about using Simpson's Rule to find the volume. They have not learned about this in their math course and are seeking guidance on how to use it. The suggestion is made to split the pedestal into constituent solids such as a sphere, cylinder, or cube. The person is also directed to look up Simpson's Rule on Wikipedia for a better understanding.
  • #1
debwaldy
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Homework Statement


hi,so in tec graphics iv been asked to calculate the area and volume of a solid pedestal?have the area bit done but confused about how to calculate the volume.we were told to use simpsons rule but i just don't understand how to use this as it was not on our math course in school,so it is merely some vague formula in the logtables to me.any direction at all would be v appreciated


Homework Equations


i have worked out that the surface area is 244636mm^2 or 2.44636*10^-1 m^2


The Attempt at a Solution


just don't know!
 
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  • #2
Have you considered splittng up the pedestal into constituant solids.
Sphere, cylinder, cube.
 
  • #3
Well, without knowing what this pedastal looks like, all I can say is, have you tried looking at what Simpson's Rule is? Wiki has a pretty good description here:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Simpson's_rule

If you can set up a function for the shape, it should be pretty cut and dry to calculate the volume based on the link above.
 

Related to Civ eng problem-volume of solid-simpsons rule

1. What is the "volume of solid" in civil engineering?

The volume of solid in civil engineering refers to the amount of space occupied by a three-dimensional object, such as a building or a bridge. It is an important factor to consider in construction projects as it determines the amount of materials needed and the overall size and stability of the structure.

2. What is the Simpsons rule and how is it used in civil engineering?

The Simpsons rule, also known as the Simpson's 1/3 rule, is a numerical method used for approximating the area under a curve. It is commonly used in civil engineering to calculate the volume of a solid by dividing it into a series of smaller, simpler shapes and using the Simpson's rule to estimate the volume of each shape. These volumes are then added together to get the overall volume of the solid.

3. How is the Simpsons rule different from other numerical methods?

The Simpsons rule is different from other numerical methods, such as the trapezoidal rule, because it uses parabolic curves to approximate the area under a curve, resulting in a more accurate estimation. It also requires fewer data points compared to other methods, making it more efficient and easier to use in civil engineering applications.

4. What are the limitations of using the Simpsons rule in civil engineering?

While the Simpsons rule is a useful method for approximating the volume of a solid, it does have limitations. It is only accurate when the shape of the solid is smooth and continuous, and it may not work well for irregular or complex shapes. Additionally, it can also be time-consuming and tedious to calculate the volumes of multiple smaller shapes and add them together.

5. Are there any alternatives to using the Simpsons rule in civil engineering?

Yes, there are other numerical methods that can be used to approximate the volume of a solid, such as the trapezoidal rule, the midpoint rule, and the composite Simpson's rule. Additionally, more advanced techniques, such as computer-aided design (CAD) software, can also be used to accurately calculate the volume of complex shapes in civil engineering projects.

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