Class suggestions for someone new to Physics

In summary, the speaker is graduating with a B.S. in mathematics with minors in chemistry, biology, and computer science. They plan to attend grad school for computer science and continue their mathematical education with topology and functional analysis. They express an interest in physics and desire to learn more about quantum mechanics. They are unsure if they have room in their schedule for physics courses and are seeking recommendations for self-study or sitting in on a course. They mention their interest in working for the NSA in the future, specifically in cryptography.
  • #1
fleazo
81
0
Some background

I am graduating in two weeks with my bachelors. I will have a B.S. in mathematics with three minors: chemistry, biology, and computer science. I am going to start grad school for computer science in the spring and will try and continue my mathematical education by taking topology and functional analysis

I feel I have gotten a well rounded scientific education with math, chem, bio, and CS, but I am completely missing physics. I once took a semester long general physics I course at a community college and didn't get much out of it.

I never thought I'd like physics but I've recently become interested. I would like to take some courses but now that I'm done with undergrad I feel I have no room for this kind of thing. I don't think I can take physics at grad school and fit it into my masters under the requirements of my upcoming degree

What would you recommend for those of you familiar with physics? Self study? Sitting in on a course? If so, what courses would be good? I really want to know more about quantum mechanics, and I'd love to tie some of my advanced math studies into this

Thanks and any suggestions will be helpful

BTW I realize I all ready posted this in another section but I realize it was in the wrong place so I'll go ahead and delete it from there..
 
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  • #2
fleazo said:
I am graduating in two weeks with my bachelors. I will have a B.S. in mathematics with three minors: chemistry, biology, and computer science. I am going to start grad school for computer science in the spring and will try and continue my mathematical education by taking topology and functional analysis.

What are you looking to do with your CS degree? What are your goals in surveying the sciences rather than concentrating on some area of research or specialization?

In general for physics there are introductory calculus based sequences that are typically required for upper level courses, although it's possible that a math major could exempt you if there's something specific you're interested in.
 
  • #3
no this purely on my own enjoyment. So the physics isn't too serious for me, its just a curiosity thing.

i want to go work for the NSA when I'm done with masters, I'm interesrted in cryptography
 

Related to Class suggestions for someone new to Physics

1. What are the recommended classes for someone new to Physics?

The recommended classes for someone new to Physics are typically introductory courses such as Physics 101 or General Physics. These classes cover the basic principles and concepts of Physics and provide a strong foundation for further study.

2. Is it necessary to have a strong math background for Physics classes?

Yes, a strong understanding of math is crucial for success in Physics classes. Physics heavily relies on mathematical equations and formulas to explain and solve problems, so it is important to have a solid grasp on algebra, trigonometry, and calculus.

3. Are there any online classes or resources available for learning Physics?

Yes, there are many online courses and resources available for learning Physics. Some popular options include Khan Academy, Coursera, and edX. These platforms offer a wide range of courses and tutorials for students of all levels.

4. Are there any recommended textbooks for Physics classes?

There are several recommended textbooks for Physics classes, depending on the level and specific topics being covered. Some popular options include "Fundamentals of Physics" by Halliday and Resnick, "University Physics" by Young and Freedman, and "Introduction to Classical Mechanics" by David Morin.

5. What are some good ways to prepare for Physics classes?

Some good ways to prepare for Physics classes include reviewing basic math concepts, familiarizing yourself with scientific notation and units, and practicing problem-solving skills. It can also be helpful to read ahead and preview the material before each class. Additionally, seeking help from a tutor or joining a study group can also be beneficial.

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