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Classical Mechanics

  1. Jun 23, 2003 #1

    My academic year draws to an end. I was hoping to prepare some of my 2nd year courses. Especially classical mechanics.

    So I was wondering if anyone could recommend a site that would allow me to get a good intoduction into the Lagrange/Hamilton formalism.

    I already found a graduate course on the subject, but find it a bit out of my league. With no knowledge of partial differential equations it is rather hard to follow, especially if all these things are considered "trivial" :wink:

    I have a good grasp of Linear Algebra (up to hermitian an symmetric operators), multivariable calculus and Newtonian mechanics, to give you an idea of the level I'm looking for.

    -Thanks in advance
  2. jcsd
  3. Jun 23, 2003 #2

    Tom Mattson

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  4. Jun 23, 2003 #3


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    I think this document


    is a great place to start. Also - During the summer I plan on building the mechanics section to my web site


    Feel free to e-mail me on anything at peter.brown46@verizon.net. It'll help guide me in deciding what to include and at what level etc. We can help each other in this respect.

  5. Jun 24, 2003 #4
    Thank yoy both.

    Tom, the one you found is exactly the one I already have. It is a bit out of my league, but I'll give it a shot anyway.

    Pete, what you have seems just fine. I'll keep in tocuh.
  6. Jun 24, 2003 #5
    I stand corrected, the Harvard one is EXCELLENT! Exactly what I was looking for.

    Their whole server is packed with courses and textbooks like this...
    The mathematics section does seem a little less developped than the physics one, but there are some interesting things there.

    The trouble is, that just using their stuff on your site will probably violate half a dozen copyright regulations

    I'll keep looking for more, and if anything else comes up I'll post it up on this thread.
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