Climate flickering ended last ice age

In summary: The article suggests that the transition to the Younger Dryas event was around 12,870 varve count years ago. However, here it is 12,700 years, which is quite robust. It is possible that it will take 30,000 years to reach its maximum increase in obliquity, and then oscillate on a smaller scale until stabilization.
  • #1
wolram
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http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/02/090216092824.htm

Quote.
The Younger Dryas event, which began approximately 12,900 years ago, was a period of rapid cooling in the Northern Hemisphere, driven by large-scale reorganizations of patterns of atmospheric and oceanic circulation. Environmental changes during this period have been documented by both proxy-based reconstructions from sediment archives and model simulations, but there is currently no consensus on the exact mechanisms of onset, stabilization, or termination of the Younger Dryas. In contrast to existing knowledge, the Nature article shows that the climate shifted repeatedly from cold and dry to wet and less cold, from decade to decade, before interglacial conditions were finally reached and the climate system became more stable.
 
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  • #2
  • #3
Yeah, great article Wolram.

Very interesting argument Andre. Very enlightening. Sorry to go on, but the 'large body close encounter' of a giant comet like near-miss with the Earth around 40,000 years ago we discussed earlier fits the bill. The tilt would have increased and then oscillated before settling into the Earth's obliquity cycle we are now familiar with. I'm surprised myself to see how it seems to fit all the criteria so effortlessly.
 
  • #4
Does it with 30,000 years in between?

Moreover there is something fishy with that article. It suggests that the transition to the YD in the Meerfelder maar varves was around 12,870 varve count years ago. However here it is 12,700 years, which is quite robust, as being 200 varve years before the mega eruption of the Laacher see maar around 12,920 years ago.
 
  • #5
Andre said:
Does it with 30,000 years in between?
It could take 30,000 years to reach it's maximum increase in obliquity, and then oscillate on a smaller scale until stabilization.
 
  • #6
Mammo, overly speculative posts are not allowed here. Do you have any peer reviewed papers on such an incident? I have found nothing in my searches that even suggests such a thing.
 
  • #7
I do seem to have got a bit carried away with myself Evo. I doubt whether there's a paper on the idea, I admit. I'm interested in other people's explanations of the fluctuations, it's a fascinating topic.
 
  • #8
You guys will have to bicker amongst yourselves, i find there is is no truths in these things, may be we will never know, but i hope for enlightenment, but now i am fizzled out.
 
  • #9
wolram said:
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/02/090216092824.htm
The Younger Dryas event, which began approximately 12,900 years ago, was a period of rapid cooling in the Northern Hemisphere, driven by large-scale reorganizations of patterns of atmospheric and oceanic circulation.
The evidence of a micrometeorite bombardment (Firestone et al) around 12.9 ka is presumably a candidate for this fluctuating climate change.
 

Related to Climate flickering ended last ice age

1. What is climate flickering and how does it relate to the end of the last ice age?

Climate flickering refers to the rapid, yet irregular changes in climate that occurred during the end of the last ice age, around 12,000 years ago. These changes were caused by natural factors such as changes in Earth's orbit and solar radiation, and were a key factor in the transition from the ice age to our current warm interglacial period.

2. Did climate flickering have a significant impact on the end of the ice age?

Yes, climate flickering played a crucial role in the end of the last ice age. It caused rapid fluctuations in temperature and precipitation, which in turn affected factors such as ice sheet growth and sea level rise. These fluctuations also influenced the development of plant and animal species, and ultimately led to the establishment of our current climate patterns.

3. What evidence supports the theory of climate flickering ending the last ice age?

There is a wealth of evidence that supports this theory. Geological records show rapid and irregular changes in climate during the end of the ice age, as well as fluctuations in ice sheet coverage and sea level rise. Additionally, studies of plant and animal fossil records show significant changes in species distribution and diversity during this time period.

4. How did scientists come to understand the role of climate flickering in the end of the ice age?

Scientists have used a combination of geological, biological, and climate data to piece together the story of how climate flickering influenced the end of the ice age. By analyzing ice cores, sediment layers, and other geological records, they have been able to reconstruct past climate patterns and understand the role of natural factors in shaping these patterns.

5. Could climate flickering occur again in the future and cause another ice age?

While it is possible that climate flickering could occur again in the future, it is unlikely to cause another ice age. This is because our current climate is heavily influenced by human activities, such as greenhouse gas emissions, which have a much stronger impact on global temperatures than natural factors. However, it is important to continue studying and monitoring our climate to better understand and prepare for any potential changes in the future.

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