Constant Acceleration Downwards

In summary, the conversation is about how gravity causes acceleration and how it applies to objects at rest on the ground. The person is confused about how they are accelerating downwards while being at rest, but it is explained that while standing on the ground, their forces are balanced and they are not actually accelerating downwards. The concept of gravity and acceleration is discussed, and the person thanks the other for correcting their understanding.
  • #1
nate99
18
0
I remember being taught that, due to gravity, we are always accelerating downwards. But how do you explain it?

Gravity is constant, and even if we are at rest, if I step on a scale I still get a weight of my mass X acceleration due to gravity. My forces vertically are balanced (me on the ground and the ground on me), therefore I have a constant velocity of no motion in the vertical direction.

But if I have no motion in the vertical direction then there is no change in velocity. I just stay at zero for velocity. So then how is my body ACCELERATING downwards? I completely understand that as soon as I jump or step off of a ledge and there is nothing to push up on me, my velocity will accelerate at 9.8 m/s2 in the down direction. But it's hard to understand how an object at rest is actually accelerating in the downward direction, unless I got my concepts mixed up, which often happens.

Thanks for the help!
 
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  • #2
You aren't accelerating downwards while standing on the ground.
Gravity applies a force to your body, which would accelerate you at approximately 9.8 m/s2 if it could.
 
  • #3
Drakkith said:
You aren't accelerating downwards while standing on the ground.
Gravity applies a force to your body, which would accelerate you at approximately 9.8 m/s2 if it could.

I see, I guess I just learned it wrong in the past. Thanks for correcting me
 

Related to Constant Acceleration Downwards

1. What is constant acceleration downwards?

Constant acceleration downwards refers to the continuous increase in speed of an object moving downwards due to the force of gravity. It is also known as free fall or acceleration due to gravity.

2. How is constant acceleration downwards calculated?

Constant acceleration downwards can be calculated using the formula a = g, where "a" is the acceleration and "g" is the acceleration due to gravity. On Earth, the value of g is approximately 9.8 meters per square second.

3. What factors affect constant acceleration downwards?

The only factor that affects constant acceleration downwards is the force of gravity, which is determined by the mass and distance between two objects.

4. Does constant acceleration downwards only occur on Earth?

No, constant acceleration downwards occurs on any object that experiences the force of gravity. This includes objects in space and on other planets.

5. What is the difference between constant acceleration downwards and constant velocity downwards?

Constant acceleration downwards involves an increase in speed due to the force of gravity, while constant velocity downwards involves maintaining the same speed while moving downwards.

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