Converting Force Measurement to Pressure

In summary, the conversation discusses the creation of a calibrator for measuring the relationship between force and pressure in a zip-tie structure. The proposed calibrator involves using a flexible silicone tube filled with water and a reservoir to set the hydrostatic pressure. The expected pressure range is from 6 kPa to 33 kPa. The conversation also mentions using a belt under tension and a rigid cylinder to calculate the normal force per unit area.
  • #1
Oseania
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0
TL;DR Summary
A zip-tie like structure squeezes an elastic part. I can measure a force that is related to the squeezing pressure. I need to create a calibrator that would allow me to correlate the force to the squeezing pressure.
I have a zip-tie like structure, which when pulled, squeezes an elastic part. Think of it like a having a zip-tie around your finger.

I can measure a force that is related to the squeezing pressure. This relationship between force and pressure is quite linear. I would now need to create a calibrator that would enable me to correlate between the measured force (N) to the pressure (Pa) that is imposed to the elastic part. The diameter of the zip-tie is about 22mm and it squeezes to about 17mm diameter.

Now, I first started to think that I would have some inflatable balloon with fixed pressure. The zip tie wouldn't move when the pressures match. I would prefer to keep this calibrator relatively simple at first stage, so any crazy, easily built ideas are welcome ;-).

Thanks.
 
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  • #2
Oseania said:
Now, I first started to think that I would have some inflatable balloon with fixed pressure. The zip tie wouldn't move when the pressures match. I would prefer to keep this calibrator relatively simple at first stage, so any crazy, easily built ideas are welcome ;-).
A flexible silicone tube, sealed at the bottom, filled with water from a reservoir with a large exposed water surface area above. The height difference sets the hydrostatic pressure at the bottom of the tube.
Bundle the bottom end of the tube in with the elastic material, tighten the zip-tie until the tube is half-collapsed under the tie. The tube collapse will occur over a narrow pressure range.

What range of pressure are you expecting ?
 
  • #3
Suppose you have a belt under tension T wrapped around a rigid cylinder of radius R. Let P be the normal force per unit area exerted by the cylinder on the belt. A force balance on the region of the belt between angular locations ##\theta## and ##\theta + d\theta## gives $$PRd\theta w=Td\theta$$where w is the width of the belt. from this it follows that $$P=\frac{T}{Rw}$$
 
  • #4
Baluncore said:
A flexible silicone tube, sealed at the bottom, filled with water from a reservoir with a large exposed water surface area above. The height difference sets the hydrostatic pressure at the bottom of the tube.
Bundle the bottom end of the tube in with the elastic material, tighten the zip-tie until the tube is half-collapsed under the tie. The tube collapse will occur over a narrow pressure range.

What range of pressure are you expecting ?
Thanks,

the pressure range is from 6 kPa to about 33kPa.
 
  • #5
Chestermiller said:
Suppose you have a belt under tension T wrapped around a rigid cylinder of radius R. Let P be the normal force per unit area exerted by the cylinder on the belt. A force balance on the region of the belt between angular locations ##\theta## and ##\theta + d\theta## gives $$PRd\theta w=Td\theta$$where w is the width of the belt. from this it follows that $$P=\frac{T}{Rw}$$
Thanks, just to verify that w is the width?
 
  • #6
Oseania said:
Thanks, just to verify that w is the width?
That's what I said.
 

1. What is the difference between force and pressure?

Force is a physical quantity that measures the interaction between two objects, while pressure is a measure of the force applied over a certain area. In other words, force is a push or pull on an object, while pressure is the amount of force distributed over a specific surface.

2. How do you convert force measurement to pressure?

To convert force measurement to pressure, you need to know the force applied and the area over which it is applied. Then, simply divide the force by the area to get the pressure. The formula for pressure is P = F/A, where P is pressure, F is force, and A is area.

3. Can you convert any force measurement to pressure?

No, not all force measurements can be converted to pressure. The force must be applied over a specific area in order to calculate pressure. For example, a force applied to a point or a line cannot be converted to pressure.

4. What units are used for force and pressure?

Force is typically measured in Newtons (N) in the International System of Units (SI). Pressure can be measured in several units, including Pascals (Pa), atmospheres (atm), and pounds per square inch (psi).

5. Why is it important to convert force measurement to pressure?

Converting force measurement to pressure allows for a more accurate understanding of the effects of force on a specific area. This is particularly important in fields such as engineering, where precise measurements are necessary for designing and constructing structures and machines.

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