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I Coulomb's law in its vector form?

  1. Oct 25, 2016 #1
    sorry I have use the image I made. Since I don't know how to perform the formula on forum :(
    This is the problem I am having.
    wtf12345.png
     
    Last edited: Oct 25, 2016
  2. jcsd
  3. Oct 25, 2016 #2

    BvU

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    Hello Rookie, :welcome:

    You would miss the direction of ##\vec F## if one of the two charges has a charge opposite to the other...
    In other words: ##\vec F## can be in the same direction as ##\vec r## or it can be in the opposite direction.
     
  4. Oct 25, 2016 #3
    suggest2.png
     
  5. Oct 25, 2016 #4
    Oh my god. I've just realized without the absolute symbols. It would be more easier to express the direction. Oh my oh my thank you very much teacher :)
     
  6. Oct 25, 2016 #5

    BvU

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    My pleasure
     
  7. Oct 25, 2016 #6
    Teacher. There's one more thing I would like to ask. I see there are many formular using "charge density". Is charge density able to be negative !?

    ae544e.gif

    If a charge density can be negative, it is very much easy to express its direction. I didn't find any vector form E that use the unit vector to express direction. They mainly focus on the magnitude.
     
  8. Oct 25, 2016 #7

    BvU

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    With ##\vec F = q\vec E\ ## you can use (almost) the same expression

    Charge density can be negative, yes: negative charge leads to negative charge density :smile:

    Your picture in post #6 comes through as a lot of letters/numbers :nb)
     
  9. Oct 25, 2016 #8

    DrGreg

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    Click HELP at the bottom of any page and then LaTeX Primer.
     
  10. Oct 30, 2016 #9
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