Current flow quandary. Capacitors VS Resistors

  • #1
Femme_physics
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  • #2
I like Serena
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Yes! :smile:

And before you ask, it's the same with coils!

Note that the voltage difference over the relevant 2 resistors is zero, since it is short circuited.
A voltage difference of zero means that no current will flow.
 
  • #3
Femme_physics
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Awesome! So, basically, current wants no dealing with resistors or anything that appears to "consume" them or makes them get to some place tons slower. They just...take a short-cut! Even with capacitors...and apparently, coils! Even though we're still not high-up on coils in my class (capacitors are still relatively new, had 2 classes on it).
 
  • #4
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Awesome! So, basically, current wants no dealing with resistors or anything that appears to "consume" them or makes them get to some place tons slower. They just...take a short-cut! Even with capacitors...and apparently, coils! Even though we're still not high-up on coils in my class (capacitors are still relatively new, had 2 classes on it).
Yes! :smile:

Suppose you have 2 resistors in parallel, with say resistances of 100 ohm and 0.000000001 ohm.
What would the equivalent resistance be?
And assuming we have an incoming current of 1 ampere, how would it split over the 2 resistors?

And once you start with capacitors, I think coils won't be far behind. :wink:
 
  • #5
Femme_physics
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Suppose you have 2 resistors in parallel, with say resistances of 100 ohm and 0.000000001 ohm.
What would the equivalent resistance be?
And assuming we have an incoming current of 1 ampere, how would it split over the 2 resistors?

I imagine that since the different is so gargantuan, the 100 ohm is being ignored and the current only flows through the 0.0000000000000001 ohm resistor?



PS :) I love your "yes!" with the smiley, you're so encouraging!
 
  • #6
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I imagine that since the different is so gargantuan, the 100 ohm is being ignored and the current only flows through the 0.0000000000000001 ohm resistor?

PS :) I love your "yes!" with the smiley, you're so encouraging!
Thanx!!! :cool:

And yes! :smile:

That is, the 100 ohm is not ignored, but the effect on the equivalent resistance and the current through it is negligibly small.
 
  • #7
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100 ohm is being ignored and the current only flows through the 0.0000000000000001 ohm resistor?
I recommend the standard engineering shorthand - The E notation.

100 = 1E2 = 1*102

0.0000000000000001 = 1E-16 = 1*10-16

It is a very handy notation.
 
  • #8
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Awesome! So, basically, current wants no dealing with resistors or anything that appears to "consume" them or makes them get to some place tons slower. They just...take a short-cut! Even with capacitors...and apparently, coils! Even though we're still not high-up on coils in my class (capacitors are still relatively new, had 2 classes on it).
Do not think that electrons are sentient. They are not intelligent agents, they are dumb particles. They do not "take a short-cut because they don't want to deal with stuff", they are "divided among parallel branches proportional to their conductance".
Dooly noted :)
Duly. (It may have been a deliberate error, but I have no way of knowing that and I make it a point to correct non-native speaker's mistakes, just in case)
 
  • #9
Integral
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