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I Dawn dead in Ceres orbit, ran out of fuel Oct 2018

  1. Oct 29, 2017 #1061

    OmCheeto

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    As do we both.
    But Ahuna Mons isn't big enough to cause the anomaly.

    "However, since the feature is only 17 km wide, it is not possible to associate the anomaly with the feature itself, but only with the general surrounding area. Positive anomaly in the Ahuna Mons region can be explained by an extrusion of high-density brines to the surface..."

    My guess is, that whatever is causing the anomaly, created Ahuna Mons.

    ps. I'm greatly looking forward to perihelion. (April, 2018!)
     
  2. Oct 30, 2017 #1062
    Somewhere, far back in this thread I mentioned to Marcus that Ceres was going to be in demand for mining eventually. I wonder what the value of all that potential "Fossil" Ocean will be in one hundred years or so.
    Curious about interpreting the map I did a little reading and thought I'd post this, a pretty good explanation overall.
    https://pubs.usgs.gov/fs/fs-0239-95/fs-0239-95.pdf
    "The isostatic gravity anomaly is calculated by
    subtracting the gravitational effect of low-density
    mountain roots below areas of high topography.
    Although these roots have never been seen, their isos-
    tatic effect has been measured and models calculated
    using topography. Isostasy is typified by floating ice-
    bergs that have 90% of their mass of ice below water
    that supports a smaller mass of ice projecting above
    water."
    (Somewhat still on subject, and very cool also.):thumbup:
    https://mrdata.usgs.gov/geophysics/gravity.html
    https://solarsystem.nasa.gov/galleries/flowing-in-flowing-out-of-aelia
     
    Last edited: Oct 30, 2017
  3. Nov 9, 2017 #1063
  4. Nov 12, 2017 #1064
    There's an interesting conundrum about Ceres, a conundrum suggested by Vesta. That latter asteroid had gotten hot enough to melt early in the Solar System's history, most likely from short-lived radionuclides like aluminum-26. If Ceres had enough of these radionuclides, then it may have been enough to melt its interior. So could Ceres have had an interior ocean in its past? An ocean like those of Europa and Enceladus.
     
  5. Nov 12, 2017 #1065

    mfb

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    See post #1057. It could still have liquid water, and it looks like it had an ocean in the past. It won't be ocean-like today, however, more like wet soil.
     
  6. Jun 22, 2018 #1066

    mfb

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    Staff: Mentor

    PIA22526_hires-678x678.jpg

    Image source and news

    The periapsis is now 35 km. There is no zero missing here. Shorter than a marathon distance.
    We will get very detailed pictures of Occator Crater.
     
  7. Sep 5, 2018 #1067

    OmCheeto

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    If anyone is still interested in the mission:
    NASA to Host Live Chat on Successful Mission to Asteroid Belt
    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California, will host a live-streamed Science Chat at 11 a.m. PDT (2 p.m. EDT) Friday, Sept. 7, during which experts will talk about the role of the agency's Dawn spacecraft in studying the beginning of our solar system, and the approaching end of its 11-year mission.

    The event will air live on NASA Television, Facebook Live, Ustream, YouTube and the agency's website.

    Participants include:

    Jim Green, NASA chief scientist
    Carol Raymond, Dawn principal investigator at JPL
    Marc Rayman, Dawn mission director and chief engineer at JPL

    The public can ask questions on Twitter using the hashtag #askNASA or in the comment section of the JPL Facebook page.

    What a wild orbit she's in right now.

    Dawn_XMO6_to_XMO7_cropped.jpg
    34 km at periapsis!

    Though the images are kind of disappointing, as they are getting so detailed, they're taking all the mystery out! :-p
     
  8. Nov 1, 2018 #1068

    OmCheeto

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    NASA's Dawn Mission to Asteroid Belt Comes to End
    News | November 1, 2018

    NASA's Dawn spacecraft has gone silent, ending a historic mission that studied time capsules from the solar system's earliest chapter.

    Dawn missed scheduled communications sessions with NASA's Deep Space Network on Wednesday, Oct. 31, and Thursday, Nov. 1. After the flight team eliminated other possible causes for the missed communications, mission managers concluded that the spacecraft finally ran out of hydrazine, the fuel that enables the spacecraft to control its pointing. Dawn can no longer keep its antennae trained on Earth to communicate with mission control or turn its solar panels to the Sun to recharge.

    Thank you again, for the last time, Marcus, for inviting me along for the ride.
    What a long strange** trip it's been.*

    ---------------
    * Dawn is supposed to be truckin' in orbit, long after I'm Dead.
    ** As in weird. As in, outer space is nothing like here on planet Earth.

    ps. Didn't the Kepler mission end just two days ago? Asking for a friend.
    hmmmm..... (google google google)
    Dia de los Muertos!
    The multi-day holiday focuses on gatherings of family and friends to pray for and remember friends and family members who have died, and help support their spiritual journey.
     
  9. Nov 1, 2018 #1069

    mfb

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    Kepler has a successor in orbit already, TESS.
    Dawn doesn't have that, but there are new asteroid missions planned:
    Psyche is expected to launch 2022 towards - you guessed it - asteroid Psyche. The idea is similar: Approach, enter orbit, lower the orbit in multiple steps with an ion thruster.
    Lucy is expected to perform 5 fly-bys at different Jupiter trojans after a launch 2021.
    DESTINY+ is a Japanese mission towards a small (6km diameter) asteroid with an expected launch date of 2022. It will be launched to low Earth orbit and will exclusively use ion engines from there on - spending the first 1.5 years to escape from Earth. Similar to Dawn it has the capability to visit multiple objects.
     
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