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Deciding between 2 senior project areas - switching from EE to physics

  1. Jul 20, 2009 #1
    Deciding between 2 senior project areas -- switching from EE to physics

    Hi,

    I'm a final year EE undergrad who has taken senior level physics courses on quantum mechanics, electrodynamics, relativity and quantum field theory (next semester). I'm considering a switch to physics, and I'm wondering whether I should work -- for my senior project -- on a project involving organic thin film transistors or one involving the study of subsurface scattering. I have an interest in both areas, although both are relatively new territories for me. Also, both projects will be computational/simulation oriented as there are few or no experimental facilities accessible immediately.

    I need some suggestions/advice to help me decide between the two topics...perhaps someone here has faced similar situations or has worked in these areas and can offer some insight.

    As for what field of physics I am looking at, I honestly do not know which one I have a greater shot at between solid state physics and particle/accelerator physics. But these are the 2 major fields I'll be looking at. And I'm pretty certain of my interests in physics. I had posted a thread about what I could do after my undergrad education, and that thread is https://www.physicsforums.com/showthread.php?t=325158", if you want to know more about me.

    Thanks in advance!
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Apr 24, 2017
  2. jcsd
  3. Jul 21, 2009 #2
    Re: Deciding between 2 senior project areas -- switching from EE to physics

    Hi, any inputs?
     
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