Dismiss Notice
Join Physics Forums Today!
The friendliest, high quality science and math community on the planet! Everyone who loves science is here!

Dense balloon

  1. Jun 30, 2011 #1

    Mentallic

    User Avatar
    Homework Helper

    I just need some clarification on this.

    It is well known that a balloon filled with helium will rise since helium is less dense than air, but what if the balloon were to stay the same weight, but the elastic itself has become much stronger, thus we could concentrate the helium even more, creating a dense helium balloon. Will it rise slower / fall to the ground?

    And are there any examples of this in real life?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Jun 30, 2011 #2

    Ryan_m_b

    User Avatar

    Staff: Mentor

    If the density of the helium (g/cm3) ever exceeds the density of the air it will fall. Assuming for a second that the balloon has no weight itself and is 1 litre in volume then filling it with helium at the same pressure as the atmosphere will cause it to rise. If you keep increasing it eventually the pressure will drive the density of the helium to greater than that of the air, no longer being buoyant it will fall.
     
  4. Jun 30, 2011 #3

    Mentallic

    User Avatar
    Homework Helper

    Thanks, I was quite sure that was the case. Would you know of any real life example that I could use to intuitively back up these claims?
     
  5. Jun 30, 2011 #4
    I guess it's not exactly the same thing, but the first thing that came to my mind were swim bladders used by fish (and I think submarines use a similar concept).
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Swim_bladder" [Broken]
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 5, 2017
  6. Jun 30, 2011 #5
  7. Jun 30, 2011 #6

    Mentallic

    User Avatar
    Homework Helper


    Oh thanks a lot you guys! This was really helpful :smile:
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 5, 2017
Know someone interested in this topic? Share this thread via Reddit, Google+, Twitter, or Facebook




Similar Discussions: Dense balloon
  1. Balloon in vacuum (Replies: 3)

  2. Balloon volume (Replies: 1)

  3. Balloons and Polygons (Replies: 3)

  4. Expansion of balloon (Replies: 11)

Loading...