Distortion in rc coupled amplifier

In summary, the person was trying to make a RC coupled amplifier, but when they connected the input signal, it became distorted. They asked for the reason and how to avoid the distortion, and someone suggested posting a diagram of the circuit to identify the issue. The person explained that they were using a small signal amplifier with a 50mv sine wave and a CRO, but the input signal was not sinusoidal. They were then asked to provide a schematic of their circuit.
  • #1
amaresh92
163
0
hi,
when i was making a rc coupled amplifier but as soon as i connect the input signal the signal gets distorted.can anyone tell me the reason for that and how to avoid the distortion?

thanks,
 
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  • #2
Yes, you might be driving the amplifier with too much signal, or you might have the bias wrong.

Post a diagram of your circuit and it may be possible to see what is wrong.

How do you know it was distorted? Were you trying to drive a speaker with the output?
 
  • #3
vk6kro said:
How do you know it was distorted? Were you trying to drive a speaker with the output?

no. actually i was making a small signal amplifier to understand the working of it.i fed a sine wave of 50mv and connected the output and input to CRO.it shows that input signal is not at all sinusoidal sine.

thanks for paying attention.
 
  • #4
amaresh92 said:
no. actually i was making a small signal amplifier to understand the working of it.i fed a sine wave of 50mv and connected the output and input to CRO.it shows that input signal is not at all sinusoidal sine.

thanks for paying attention.

Can you post a schematic of your circuit?
 

What is distortion in RC coupled amplifier?

Distortion in RC coupled amplifier refers to any unwanted changes or alterations in the output signal from the amplifier compared to the original input signal. This can be caused by various factors such as non-linearity in the amplifier circuit, improper biasing, or frequency-dependent losses.

What are the types of distortion in RC coupled amplifier?

The two main types of distortion in RC coupled amplifier are harmonic distortion and intermodulation distortion. Harmonic distortion is caused by non-linearities in the amplifier circuit, resulting in unwanted harmonics in the output signal. Intermodulation distortion is caused by the mixing of two or more signals in the amplifier, resulting in the creation of new frequencies that were not present in the original signals.

What are the causes of distortion in RC coupled amplifier?

Distortion in RC coupled amplifier can be caused by a variety of factors such as improper biasing, non-linearities in the amplifier circuit, and frequency-dependent losses. It can also be caused by external factors such as temperature changes, component aging, and power supply fluctuations.

How can distortion in RC coupled amplifier be reduced?

To reduce distortion in RC coupled amplifier, proper biasing and component selection are crucial. Using linear components and minimizing frequency-dependent losses can also help reduce distortion. Additionally, regular maintenance and calibration of the amplifier can help prevent distortion caused by external factors.

Can distortion in RC coupled amplifier be completely eliminated?

While distortion in RC coupled amplifier can be minimized, it cannot be completely eliminated. This is because no amplifier circuit is perfectly linear and there will always be some level of distortion present. However, with proper design and maintenance, the distortion can be kept within acceptable levels for most applications.

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