Dismiss Notice
Join Physics Forums Today!
The friendliest, high quality science and math community on the planet! Everyone who loves science is here!

Do I have to spay my cat?

  1. Apr 15, 2006 #1
    Is it considered cruel to spay a cat?

    This morning my cat started acting completely differently then she normally does. She will not stop whining. She digs into the carpet with her claws and pulls herself forward to brush herself on the carpet, then does this in circles all around the living room. When I pet her she sticks her butt into the air. I think she's in heat.

    She has never been to the vet before and she is about 2 years old. I'm afraid that it would be cruel or painful to the cat to have her fixed. She's an indoor cat so I don't think she will be impregnated.
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Apr 15, 2006 #2

    Moonbear

    User Avatar
    Staff Emeritus
    Science Advisor
    Gold Member

    Why would it be cruel? In addition to preventing the risk of her getting loose and getting pregnant (if she's in heat, watch her very carefully that she doesn't escape...if there's a male anywhere nearby, she'll try), it prevents them from getting uterine or ovarian cancer. Spayed pets also have a longer lifespan than unspayed pets (true for both cats and dogs).

    Why has she not been to a vet before? She should be vaccinated, checked for worms, and given an overall checkup at least once a year. Take her to a vet. You can discuss with the vet in more depth the risks vs benefits of spaying when you bring her in for her shots.
     
  4. Apr 15, 2006 #3
    Spaying is not at all cruel. Declawing is another matter, but there's nothing wrong with spaying. I also agree with Moonbear, you should take her to the vet, then probably start keeping up with yearly checkups.
     
  5. Apr 15, 2006 #4

    Astronuc

    User Avatar

    Staff: Mentor

    If you are not planning to allow the cat to have kittens, spaying would be better for her as mentioned by Moonbear. We had our females spayed and males neutered. All of our cats were strays, and we do not need to add to the population of cats and dogs, since there are so many unwanted or abandoned pets, and many in urban areas are 'destroyed' if no one adopts them.
     
  6. Apr 15, 2006 #5
    A lttile offtopic but,
    How would you feel If I remove your testes?
    Animals were designed to reproduce so I think you shouldn't disallow them to do that, just watch out if you really don't want her to have any kittens, but don't try to cause pain to animals. They also feel.
     
  7. Apr 15, 2006 #6
    I think in some states you don't have to.
    You should look your states laws about spaying requirments.
     
  8. Apr 15, 2006 #7

    Evo

    User Avatar

    Staff: Mentor

    Heartless, the animals are given anesthesia, they don't suffer. I live in a country setting and there is a large feral cat population here. For some reason, people think that this is the place to dump their unwanted pets. I can't tell you how many cats I have taken to the local humane society to have spayed and neutered and then released. They have a special price for people, like me, that will take the time to bring these animals in. They are willing to work with feral cats, which is pretty brave. I just have to lure them into the cat carrier. They have to get the cat out of the carrier. I really admire these vets that volunteer their time for this.
     
  9. Apr 15, 2006 #8

    Pengwuino

    User Avatar
    Gold Member

    This is Bob Barker for the price is right, remember to have your pets spayed or neutered
     
  10. Apr 15, 2006 #9
    I thought that since de-clawing is cruel, doing this might also be cruel, but I guess not.

    This cat I just got about a month ago; it was a needy cat who had nowhere to live so I took her in. And only a couple weeks ago actually she came out of hiding. Now we are the best of friends, but her behavior today certainly is abnormal.

    One more question I though of since I just got this cat as an adult, will they still want to give her all the vaccinations that they give to kittie's? She should still get all those shots, right. There's no window of opportunity or anything that was missed right?
     
    Last edited: Apr 15, 2006
  11. Apr 15, 2006 #10

    Evo

    User Avatar

    Staff: Mentor

    That's great that you took her in! You are correct that her behavior is from her being in heat.

    The vet will most likely insist she get the required vaccinations. It's never too late to get her up to date.
     
  12. Apr 15, 2006 #11
    Thank you! I will set up an appointment first thing Monday morning.

    I am so happy I took this cat in. I wish breeders would stop making so many new puppies and kitties for the yuppies who want to buy them for $500.00 a piece, when there are so many perfectly good animals who get destroyed because they cannot find a home. It's really sad.
     
  13. Apr 15, 2006 #12
    My cats are fixed, both males...and both happy and healthy.
     
  14. Apr 16, 2006 #13
    Always, always get your animals fixed if you don't have them for breeding purposes. It doesn't affect their personalities, they live longer, it doesn't hurt them. Well, okay, any surgery isn't a walk in the park. But cats, female cats. recover from that surgery with amazing speed. The clinics treat them well, it's an in-and-out one day thing. Far, far better than putting up with monthly heat and the chances of them escaping outdoors. Not only do you then have to worry about pregnancy, then you have to worry about them contracting FIV, and any number of fatal diseases. No. Treat them well. Take them to the vet. Get them fixes.
     
  15. Apr 16, 2006 #14

    Monique

    User Avatar
    Staff Emeritus
    Science Advisor
    Gold Member

    I don't agree that is doesn't change their personalities: some animals get fixed because of their personalities.
     
  16. Apr 16, 2006 #15

    Mk

    User Avatar

    OMG DO NOT EVER try and perform unsedated live amputation on your cat!!!!! It is EXTREMELY CRUEL!!
     
  17. Apr 16, 2006 #16

    Moonbear

    User Avatar
    Staff Emeritus
    Science Advisor
    Gold Member

    True, eliminating the source of those reproductive hormones can help eliminate a lot of the negative behaviors (negative in terms of being a good pet, like howling or marking). However, when an animal is spayed or neutered when older, particularly in the case of neutering males that are already showing those adult behaviors, removing the source of testosterone is not always effective at stopping the behavior. They really should be neutered while young, before they develop those adult behaviors that are not very endearing to their owners (like spraying).

    Huh? What?! You're just talking absolute nonsense there. Nothing is performed unsedated...and, actually, not even with just sedation, but with full anesthesia! The standard procedure also involves giving an analgesic while the animal is under anesthesia so that the analgesic is already effective as soon as the animal starts waking up.
     
  18. Apr 16, 2006 #17

    Math Is Hard

    User Avatar
    Staff Emeritus
    Science Advisor
    Gold Member

    I wish I had firmer statistics on this, but the low numbers say that about 3-4 million unwanted cats and dogs are euthanized in shelters each year. The high numbers say it's around 15 million. I urge any pet owner reading this who might have reservations about spaying/neutering their animal to please consider this.

    More pet overpulation statistics:
    http://www.hsus.org/pets/issues_aff...istics/hsus_pet_overpopulation_estimates.html

    Myths and facts about spaying and neutering:
    http://www.hsus.org/pets/pet_care/myths_and_facts_about_spaying_and_neutering.html
     
  19. Apr 16, 2006 #18

    Monique

    User Avatar
    Staff Emeritus
    Science Advisor
    Gold Member

    For pets maybe, but do you know how they neuter male piglets? They hang them upside down and amputate their testes, unsedated, they put on some medication to stop the wound from infecting and let them run loose again. Maybe things are done differently in the US, but here in the Netherlands that is how things are done: it costs too much money to anesthesize them and it takes too much time. They could just not neuter them, but then the meat becomes less tender and the male pigs become harder to handle. A good reason to stop eating pork.


    Ah, here it is written out exactly as I just said: http://www.swabe.org/ast.htm
     
    Last edited: Apr 16, 2006
  20. Apr 17, 2006 #19

    Monique

    User Avatar
    Staff Emeritus
    Science Advisor
    Gold Member

    So I was actually curious to know whether pigs in the US are anesthetized during castration.
     
  21. Apr 17, 2006 #20
    If they are pets I imagine the answer is yes. However, feed animals are generally not protected by many of the laws against animal cruelty that apply to non-feed animals.
     
Know someone interested in this topic? Share this thread via Reddit, Google+, Twitter, or Facebook

Have something to add?



Similar Discussions: Do I have to spay my cat?
  1. I miss my cat (Replies: 13)

  2. What do I have? (Replies: 16)

  3. Do I have ADD? (Replies: 14)

Loading...