DO you think this is real?

  • Thread starter LucasGB
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Do you guys think this really works?
http://www.xamuel.com/inverse-graphing-calculator.php [Broken]
I wasn't able to verify it with my graphing software.
 
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  • #2
Mentallic
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It looks incredible! Really mind-boggling!
I always wondered if words and pictures could be made out of equations in cartesian form.

I tried the letter O which should have just been a circle radius 1 unit centre (3,3) by the looks of it, and this is what it gives:

[tex]\left((x-3)^2+(y-3)^2-1\right)^2+\left(y^2-6y+8+\sqrt{y^4-12y^3+52y^2-96y+64}\right)^2=0[/tex]

Now, the first part is the correct equation for the circle, but what's this extra nonsense that's tacked on?
 
  • #3
statdad
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  • #4
Mentallic
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So it works?
 
  • #6
statdad
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That expression is added to the ``formula'' for words and sentences as well. Perhaps it's important to the work; perhaps it's a private joke by the programmer.
 
  • #7
Mentallic
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Yes I believe it does work. And once you start to realize the pattern (go for 1 simple letter at first, such as O and X and work your way from there), it's not as unbelievably impossible as you first might have thought - including myself.
 
  • #8
DrGreg
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If you look at the structure of the equation for several letters, you will see a pattern emerging, e.g. for 3 letters

[tex] z_1^2 \, z_2^2 \, z_3^2 \, + \, w^2 \, = \, 0 [/tex]​

where z1 is a formula for the first letter, z2 is a formula for the second letter, z3 is a formula for the third letter, and w is always the same each time, and all of them functions of x and y.

Note that the equation is true if and only if w is zero and at least one of the other expressions is zero.

w is zero if [itex]2 \leq y \leq 4[/itex] and otherwise non-zero, so the effect of adding w2 is to prevent any curves being drawn above y=4 or below y=2. In the case of a circle ("O") it doesn't matter, but for some of the other letters, the formula given creates the correct symbol between heights 2 and 4 but also creates extra lines outside that range, so adding w2 suppresses the unwanted lines.
 
  • #10
uart
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If you look at the structure of the equation for several letters, you will see a pattern emerging, e.g. for 3 letters

[tex] z_1^2 \, z_2^2 \, z_3^2 \, + \, w^2 \, = \, 0 [/tex]​

where z1 is a formula for the first letter, z2 is a formula for the second letter, z3 is a formula for the third letter, and w is always the same each time, and all of them functions of x and y.

Note that the equation is true if and only if w is zero and at least one of the other expressions is zero.

w is zero if [itex]2 \leq y \leq 4[/itex] and otherwise non-zero, so the effect of adding w2 is to prevent any curves being drawn above y=4 or below y=2. In the case of a circle ("O") it doesn't matter, but for some of the other letters, the formula given creates the correct symbol between heights 2 and 4 but also creates extra lines outside that range, so adding w2 suppresses the unwanted lines.
Nice explaination of the mysterious extra term. Thanks DrGreg. :)
 
  • #11
Mentallic
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Yeah, nice explanation DrGreg! :smile:

I also cannot comprehend why every term is being squared. What is the effect of this?
 

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