Do you think you have to be mature to succeed in life?

  • #1
is maturity a requirement to succeed in life? what do you think about immature famous people social media shows? if you find a weakness in this question please let me know!
 

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  • #2
symbolipoint
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Unclear if yes or no; but maturity HELPS.
 
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  • #3
Borek
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Define "succeed in life".
 
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  • #4
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Please consider the imprecision of the question: a neonate is immature and cannot survive without aid; a centegenarian is in some sense mature and may require aid for survival.
 
  • #5
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A mature person knows how to prioritize others before themselves. The ability to get past one's own desires and consider the needs of others is a powerful mark of maturity. Empathy, in one word
Succeed word doesn't belong to the same semantic field. Thus, it has nothing in common. That's my personal opinion.
 
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  • #6
Fervent Freyja
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First, you have to define what you mean by success and maturity.

General success for the majority relies upon external factors. A child actor can achieve success largely because they depend upon others. Many wealthy people had great resources in their childhood to pounce on- either knowledge, finances, or social resources had been at their advantage.

In my book, a person near totally independent from any entity or other person is truly successful. A person in the same class achieving their doctorate after being supported by an educated, middle class family isn’t as successful as a person achieving that same doctorate after not being supported and guided by a family or any external resources at all- they likely had thousands more obstacles over the years and put in more effort. Generally, society would deem those 2 individuals to be equally successful; regardless, the person with more challenges would likely be more mature than the other. Who’s the judge?!
 
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  • #7
HAYAO
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In my opinion, maturity have to do more with being able to actually integrate your quality and being able to appropriately apply them in real life. Success is how much one can contribute to other people in a productive way. High maturity means high level of integrity and high level of optimization in the applicability. High success means high level of positive effect on other people (could be high quality in small number of people or moderate quality in vast majority of the population). I would go far as to say that housewives raising children into happy adults are extremely successful in my opinion because that's how much they contributed to their children (despite the diminishing social value of housewives in modern society). If "success in life" can be defined the way I did above, then having maturity is automatically a success in life. More maturity means more success.

For example, I often hear people saying that aggressive personality is bad, and portrayed in media that it's something that needs to be suppressed. I completely disagree to this notion because aggressive personality can actually contribute to the society. Becoming a mob or a police officer both requires certain level of aggressiveness, but they have two polar opposite effect to the society. It's really about how it is used. So if one is born with innate personality of aggressiveness (happens often in men), then the first step is to acknowledge it, the second step is to integrate it as part of their personality, and the third step is to use them wisely so that other people benefit from you. Be hungry, but civil. That's an example of maturity.

Another example is neuroticism. I also often hear that high neuroticism is not good because you are too sensitive and easily become anxious and sad. I happen to disagree with this as well because they also have a good role in our society. People with relatively high neuroticism can be more aware of the possible risks in tasks, so they effectively avoid hazards (it should be noted that it becomes a negative factor in extremely risky tasks such as entrepreneurship for indirect reason). Once again, it's how you use it, and to use it wisely so that people benefits from you. Be negative, but positively. That's an example of maturity.

Immature people tend not to be able to apply their quality very well in real life. The reason undisciplined children whine in supermarkets about their parents not buying them snacks is because they are unable to appropriately control their emotions or to express them properly. Let them be that way and they may have tons of health problems in the future. However, mature people may have a snack time as a treat for themselves for working a prolonged amount of time. Snacks themselves aren't the problem. The desire for snacks itself is also not the problem. It's how it's used. Properly raised/socialized children learn this naturally throughout their childhood by figuring out with other people what they like and what they don't, leading to better fit social behavior. I am worried about current generation of kids having less opportunities to be properly socialized.
 
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  • #8
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I am worried about current generation of kids having less opportunities to be properly socialized.
Me too. Here in the Basque Country I get angry whenever I see a boy that in my personal opinion is overprotected, or when I see parents delegate to the child decissions that, at least, should be shared.
Very good and detailed explanation. Thanks!
 
  • #9
Maturity has nothing to do with age. It comes from, mistakes, experiences, learning, and understanding. Success meanwhile is a by-product of being matured.
 
  • #10
According to some definitions I think maturity is when someone or something has reached its end.But when setting goals and developing your characteristics of your personality and working and learning how can maturity describe a person in this?In my opinion it can not because these things are in all of someone's life.The person keeps developing himself,his characteristics, his work and he keeps setting goals throughtout his life.
 
  • #11
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Success means different things to different people. One might be considered successful by their own personal criteria while others judging that person by their own personal criteria would not judge it the same. So which one is right? You could say both are right, but which one matters?

If you allow yourself to be judged by others criteria you will NEVER be happy as you can't possibly be all things for all people. The only judge you should obide by is yourself, that is the path to true contentment and personal success in life.
 
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  • #12
symbolipoint
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Different types of Intelligence are recognized. Maybe same with Maturity.

Mature does not mean "reached the end". Something which has reached its end is usually dead. Better, fully mature could mean, stable and effective.
 
  • #13
jbriggs444
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"Maturity", in my view is largely self-discipline. Deferred gratification. Brushing one's teeth because it will prevent tooth decay and gum erosion rather than because mommy is watching.
 
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  • #14
HAYAO
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"Maturity", in my view is largely self-discipline. Deferred gratification. Brushing one's teeth because it will prevent tooth decay and gum erosion rather than because mommy is watching.
Indeed. In a more broader sense, maintaining habits that benefits you on the long run. You don't study just because your teacher tells you to, but because it's simply good for you on the long run. You don't exercise or eat healthy just because you want to lose weight for the wedding, but because you want to maintain strong and healthy body on the long run.

I see more often than not that adult who is morbidly obese is an indication that they just simply lack self-discipline. They will continue daily habits that not only do not have any benefits but actually worsen everything for themselves and the people around them.

The millennials (which includes me) and beyond have poor self-discipline in general. I often felt sad when I was a college student where people just impulsively complain about everything that's "wrong" in our society, while they maintain none of the beneficial habits that could get them be happy and become productive to the society. Of course they are going to complain about everything. It's even sadder seeing on twitter (I don't do SNS but have seen them) about how poorly college is managing COVID-19 and how students should be compensated for the "lost" quality of the lectures, when good self-discipline is the answer.
 
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  • #15
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Well, it's difficult. I've seen many 'successful' manager with the personality of a child in his defiant age/period o0)

Some of them even threw a tantrum when the math said 'no'.
Guess it really depends on the definition of 'success'.
 
  • #16
Well, it's difficult. I've seen many 'successful' manager with the personality of a child in his defiant age/period o0)

Some of them even threw a tantrum when the math said 'no'.
Guess it really depends on the definition of 'success'.
The general definition of success is about reaching a goal,achieving a goal. Someone could consider effort as success. Some popular views consider success as doing some very sinful things I do not want to say, some others becoming a top scientist or a polymath, others having one of the highest places in society, the last one may lead to egoism and pride.
 
  • #17
Success is not always helpful, good,moral or important. It depends on the goals someone sets.
 
  • #18
symbolipoint
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Success is not always helpful, good,moral or important. It depends on the goals someone sets.
So an immature person with the wrong goals can be a success in achieving those wrong goals. Maybe. MAYBE only.
 
  • #19
jbriggs444
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So an immature person with the wrong goals can be a success in achieving those wrong goals. Maybe. MAYBE only.
Science can do a decent job at helping us find the rules of the game. Victory conditions, not so much.

"Wrong" is a strong word to use to describe the goals which someone else chooses for themselves.
 
  • #20
symbolipoint
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Science can do a decent job at helping us find the rules of the game. Victory conditions, not so much.

"Wrong" is a strong word to use to describe the goals which someone else chooses for themselves.
"Wrong" may be a strong word, but choose a different word if doing so helps you find or see the meaning.
 
  • #21
phinds
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The general definition of success is about reaching a goal,achieving a goal.
So you don't think it's possible for someone to achieve happiness without setting goals? If that's the case then I think you lack experience. You seem, in all of your posts, to rely way too rigidly on dictionary-type definitions of things and not to have other considerations.
 
  • #22
jbriggs444
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"Wrong" may be a strong word, but choose a different word if doing so helps you find or see the meaning.
I do not disagree with the sentiment. I see a lot of people who pursue goals which I see as silly, harmful to others or even harmful to themselves. But that is a subjective value judgement.

If someone's sense of self is improved by having a boob job, I may disagree with the decision, but I will try not to call it "wrong".
 
  • #23
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Success is not always helpful, good,moral or important.
Well, you see:

Psycho often works too.
Success, a kind of.

We lack a good definition for this discussion.
 
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  • #24
So you don't think it's possible for someone to achieve happiness without setting goals? If that's the case then I think you lack experience. You seem, in all of your posts, to rely way too rigidly on dictionary-type definitions of things and not to have other considerations.
He can. But is happiness the big goal? Is it so important? It can be a motivation for work. Not having very much happiness does not necessarily mean someone is sad. Someone may work and be happy while working but is it necessary for him to seek more happiness? What if there are limits in the happiness some works can provide? When are those limits reached? I am not proposing someone to be sad or not have happiness.
 
  • #25
phinds
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He can. But is happiness the big goal? Is it so important? It can be a motivation for work. Not having very much happiness does not necessarily mean someone is sad. Someone may work and be happy while working but is it necessary for him to seek more happiness? What if there are limits in the happiness some works can provide? When are those limits reached? I am not proposing someone to be sad or not have happiness.
More word salad. You should have just stopped after "he can"
 

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