Does anyone else have the problem:

  • Thread starter K.J.Healey
  • Start date
In summary: I do that sometimes, especially with "the" and only when writing.I do that when I write. I was trying to find an example in some old hand written notes but I used to rewrite them if I made a mistake. I did find one page with 3 mistakes on though. :eek: I don't know what I was thinking that day.That's a new one to me. I know people do that in speaking, but haven't noticed it in writing before. Kurdt, do you also have sloppy handwriting, possibly writing letters from the bottom up? I do, and my science teacher this year does similar and says it is "disgraphia"No not really. Here are my
  • #1
K.J.Healey
626
0
Where when typing, or more often writing, where if a word ends in the same letter as the next word's first, you join the words together? I seem to do this, especially when writing by hand. Probably 80% of the time that I could.

Like this:
I wantedinner so i wento eachotel.

Thats obviously extreme. But its frustrating by hand, and I feel like by the time my hand finishes writing a sentence my brain is thinking about the next page...
 
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  • #2
I don't think I've ever done that...
 
  • #3
I do that sometimes, especially with "the" and only when writing.
 
  • #4
I do that when I write. I was trying to find an example in some old hand written notes but I used to rewrite them if I made a mistake. I did find one page with 3 mistakes on though. :eek: I don't know what I was thinking that day.
 
  • #5
That's a new one to me. I know people do that in speaking, but haven't noticed it in writing before. I make plenty of typos, especially the faster I type, but haven't done that one (at least not yet).
 
  • #6
I was just thinking about this some more because I don't tend to worry about it, but I remember that I do this quite often with the words "with the" in that order and it comes out as "withe". I couldn't find an example since I tended to rewrite my notes if I made a mistake like that.
 
  • #7
Kurdt, do you also have sloppy handwriting, possibly writing letters from the bottom up? I do, and my science teacher this year does similar and says it is "disgraphia"
 
  • #8
binzing said:
Kurdt, do you also have sloppy handwriting, possibly writing letters from the bottom up? I do, and my science teacher this year does similar and says it is "disgraphia"

No not really. Here are my notes with other mistakes.

http://img81.imageshack.us/img81/7219/notescy0.jpg

I don't know why I photographed them.
 
Last edited by a moderator:
  • #9
Kurdt said:
I don't know why I photographed them.
Well, we learn from our mistakes. Now we can learn from yours.
 
  • #10
Moonbear said:
That's a new one to me. I know people do that in speaking
What would you call that? A 'sayo'?
 
  • #11
K.J.Healey said:
Where when typing, or more often writing, where if a word ends in the same letter as the next word's first, you join the words together? I seem to do this, especially when writing by hand. Probably 80% of the time that I could.

Like this:
I wantedinner so i wento eachotel.

Thats obviously extreme. But its frustrating by hand, and I feel like by the time my hand finishes writing a sentence my brain is thinking about the next page...

If you used a Dvorak keyboard instead of a Qwerty keyboard, you'd be less likely to do that when typing. I have nothing when it comes to writing. Maybe you should buy a faster pen?
 
  • #12
I never done it before...
 

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