Dismiss Notice
Join Physics Forums Today!
The friendliest, high quality science and math community on the planet! Everyone who loves science is here!

Does anyone know about brusselators?

  1. Jul 23, 2013 #1
    I just maybe realized something: out of the what, 2 million people in PF I may be the expert on brusselators. Surely it ain't so Jack. And I won't bore many of you reading this trying to explain what a brusselator is.

    Well, someone in PF is asking me for help and I don't feel like it. I feel bad about it. It's not easy. I mean the brusselator. It would take lots of work for me to even review it as it's been a few years since I've worked on it. Got other things to do. Still I feel bad about it.

    Surely I'm not the brusselator expert in here.
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Jul 23, 2013 #2

    jtbell

    User Avatar

    Staff: Mentor

    Brusselator? Is that what you use to "persuade" kids who don't want to eat their vegetables?
     
  4. Jul 24, 2013 #3
    Ok, I'm sorry. I should have explained. It's a differential equation and what I'm sayin' is that well, if nobody else can do it out of the millions of PF members, and I'm the only one (with Mathematica code that runs nicely), then maybe I might feel a little obligated to at least just look into it. There are some very smart people in the DE forum though.
     
  5. Jul 24, 2013 #4

    Pythagorean

    User Avatar
    Gold Member

    I had to write a brusselator program for my stochastic processes class last semester using the Gillespie direct method.
     
  6. Jul 24, 2013 #5
    Hello Pythagorean,

    And you weren't interested in the Red Bull speed ball huh? Neural stuff, no? But I digress.

    I seem to have lost the PM I received asking for help. I guess I deleted it thinking it was the same person who asked me a few months ago. Maybe though it wasn't.

    Anyway, I would have asked you if you would have been willing to help someone with it but I don't remember who the person was. I really barely understand it; enough to write code for the Turing patterns to emerge, some other nice GUI stuff.

    How about if anyone else asks me, I'll suggest to them they contact you or anyone else replying to this thread that is familiar with it. In that way I can help.
     
  7. Jul 24, 2013 #6

    Pythagorean

    User Avatar
    Gold Member

    I'm no expert, really. The brusselator wasn't that engaging for me, it was just a homework assignment and the assignment as a whole was more focused on studying Gillespie's stochastic sumulation algorithm (ssa).
     
  8. Jul 24, 2013 #7

    SteamKing

    User Avatar
    Staff Emeritus
    Science Advisor
    Homework Helper

    I have lived my entire life (> 50 years) and worked my entire engineering career without knowing what a brusselator is, nor even hearing the term until I read this thread. Thankfully, also, I was never forced to write a brusselator program using the direct Gillespie method either. Gillespie? Wasn't he the sheriff over in Sparta, Mississippi a while back?
     
  9. Jul 25, 2013 #8
    I mean me neither dude. I heard about them when I was a young boy. I had this Popular Science book on mathematics and it briefly mentioned the elusive "simultaneous system of non-linear partial-differential equations" and I was intrigued. It took me most of my life to find out what they actually were and since I live in a constant state of barely understanding the math I work on, these are no exceptions. :)
     
    Last edited: Jul 25, 2013
  10. Jul 25, 2013 #9

    Pythagorean

    User Avatar
    Gold Member

    It (Gillespie's method) is actually a pretty slick way of solving stochastic systems. If you want to do it explicity, you can't use your standard Runge-Kutta and/or Euler methods. The statistics don't work out. In stochastic systems, the step size goes as sqrt(dt) rather than dt :bugeye:.
     
  11. Jul 25, 2013 #10
    well I mean if you guys wanted to start a brand-new thread about it and stuff, I might be willing to dig-up some of my code. I don't know so much about the statistics but I recall using only the build-in methods and techniques of NDSolve in Mathematica to generate all sorts of Turing patterns in 2D, and I guess I did some other things as well, mostly illustrating nicely the results in different formats.

    I stopped working on it a few years ago because I didn't see anything new I could contribute.
     
  12. Jul 25, 2013 #11

    Pythagorean

    User Avatar
    Gold Member

    I'm good; I have a dissertation and a manuscript to put my effort into, currently.
     
  13. Jul 25, 2013 #12
    Good to hear that. Make something happen! :)
     
  14. Jul 29, 2013 #13
    I guess I made a mistake starting this thread. I'm sorry. It's not that much work and at least now I know who it is so if they are willing to start a brand-new thread on coding the Brusselator in Mathematica in the coding forum, I'll help if I can.

    Guess we can't just delete the whole thing right?
     
    Last edited: Jul 29, 2013
Know someone interested in this topic? Share this thread via Reddit, Google+, Twitter, or Facebook




Similar Discussions: Does anyone know about brusselators?
  1. Does anyone know Polish? (Replies: 28)

Loading...