Does Gravity Affect the Inertia Load in a Dual-Weight Pulley System?

In summary, the conversation discusses a counterweight system being developed by the speaker and their associate. The system consists of two 850 lb weights connected by a chain and suspended by two pulleys, one of which is connected to a motor. The speaker is trying to calculate the torque required to move the system 40 inches in 1 second and believes that the only forces to overcome are inertia and system friction. They question whether the inertia load is 1700 lbs or 850 lbs, as their associate believes gravity will remove one of the loads, but the speaker argues that gravity should cancel out since it acts on both weights.
  • #1
CuriousAbout
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I have a counterweight system I am trying to develop. One of my associates and I are in disagreement over something though.

The system is simple, it is effectivly two 850 Lb weights connected together by a chain. The chain is suspended by two pulleys. One of the pulleys is connected to motor. I am trying to calculate the torque required to move the system 40 inches in 1 second.

I believe the only forces that I have to overcome is inertia due to acceleration and the system friction. Assuming there is no friction the inertia is all that is l have to overcome.

Here is my question: Is the inertia load 1700 Lbs or 850. My associate says gravity will remove one of the loads but if gravity acts on both weights shouldn't it cancel out?
 

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  • #2
You are correct.
 
  • #3


I would like to clarify that inertia is not a force, but rather a property of matter that describes its resistance to change in motion. In this scenario, the inertia of the weights will play a role in the acceleration of the system, but it is not a force that needs to be overcome.

To calculate the torque required to move the system, we need to consider the forces acting on the weights. In this case, there are two forces acting on each weight: the force of gravity pulling them downward and the force of the chain pulling them upward. These forces are equal in magnitude, but opposite in direction, resulting in a net force of zero and no movement.

However, when the motor is turned on, it will apply a torque to the pulley, causing the chain to move and the weights to accelerate. The amount of torque required will depend on the mass of the weights and the acceleration you want to achieve. It is not correct to assume that the inertia of the weights is the only force that needs to be overcome.

In terms of the question about the inertia load, it is not accurate to say that it is either 1700 lbs or 850 lbs. The inertia of the system will depend on the mass and distribution of the weights, as well as the acceleration. It is important to consider the mass of both weights when calculating the torque required.

In conclusion, the torque required to move the system will depend on the forces acting on the weights, including gravity and the force applied by the motor. The inertia of the system will play a role in the acceleration, but it is not a force that needs to be overcome. It is important to consider all forces and factors when designing your counterweight system.
 

1. What is inertia due to acceleration?

Inertia due to acceleration is the tendency of an object to resist changes in its velocity when an external force is applied. This means that the object will continue to move at a constant speed and direction unless acted upon by a net force.

2. How is inertia due to acceleration different from regular inertia?

Inertia due to acceleration is specifically related to changes in an object's velocity, whereas regular inertia refers to an object's resistance to changes in its state of motion, whether it is at rest or in motion.

3. How does mass affect inertia due to acceleration?

The greater the mass of an object, the greater its inertia due to acceleration. This means that a more massive object will require a larger force to cause a change in its velocity compared to a less massive object.

4. Can inertia due to acceleration be measured?

Inertia due to acceleration can be indirectly measured by observing the changes in an object's velocity when different forces are applied to it. However, there is no direct method to measure it, as it is a property of an object rather than a physical quantity.

5. How does friction affect inertia due to acceleration?

Friction can act as a resisting force on an object, which can cause a change in its velocity and therefore affect its inertia due to acceleration. For example, a car's brakes use friction to slow down and bring the car to a stop, which is a change in its velocity.

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