Does Lactose Intolerance Mean I Cannot Absorb Nutrition from Milk?

In summary, lactose intolerance is the inability to digest milk sugar and this leads to gas, diarrhea, and worse. Taking lactase may help the body to both handle dairy better and absorb nutrients in the stomach.
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kyphysics
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I know that being intolerant makes it so that my stomach doesn't digest milk/dairy products very well. I get gas and diarrhea at times.

But, would it also mean that when I eat something with dairy that my body does not digest the nutrition in it (as it may be "kicking" it out of my body...or is that what happens)?

And, lastly (if it's true I cannot digest/absorb the nutrients), would taking lactase help my body to both handle dairy better and absorb nutrients in my stomach at that time? Thanks!
 
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I am not an MD. But lactose intolerance is the inability to digest milk sugar. So it just goes right on through the stomach into the intestines where the bacteria have a milk sugar party! Gas and worse. I think the stomach can still extract the other nutrients however...
 
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The stomach doesn’t absorb sugar as far as I know. Disaccharides are not absorbed by the intestine as disaccharides. They must be hydrolyzed first to the monosaccharides. Sucrose is acted upon by sucrase. Lactose by lactase. Without lactase, lactose feeds something else in the gut.
Everything else in milk is absorbable though the ileum and jejunum.
 
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I came late to the show here.

Glucose/dextrose - Monosaccharides - are absorbed under the tongue as well as in the stomach. Pretty much throughout the entire alimentary system.

Gut generally bacteria metabolize simple carbohydrate in the colon before it can be absorbed. In fact, a fraction of dietary fiber, like dextrin, is broken down to monosaccharides there by gut flora. Which metabolize them.
Why fiber is needed for healthy gut.

Home treatment for hypoglycemic diabetic kids is to place a glucose pill or liquid under the tongue. This is especially effective when they are not conscious or having seizures and cannot swallow pills or liquids.

Hypoglycemia, low blood sugar, is commonly the result of (pick one or more):
too much insulin
too much exercise
not enough carbohydrates consumed earlier
-- for Type I pediatric patients.
 
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1. What is lactose intolerance?

Lactose intolerance is a condition in which the body is unable to properly digest and absorb lactose, a type of sugar found in milk and dairy products. This is due to a deficiency or absence of the enzyme lactase, which is responsible for breaking down lactose into simpler sugars that can be absorbed by the body.

2. How does lactose intolerance affect the absorption of nutrients from milk?

Since individuals with lactose intolerance do not produce enough lactase, the lactose in milk cannot be broken down and absorbed by the body. This means that the nutrients in milk, such as calcium, vitamin D, and protein, are not properly absorbed and utilized by the body.

3. Can individuals with lactose intolerance still consume milk and get the necessary nutrients?

Yes, individuals with lactose intolerance can still consume milk and get the necessary nutrients by using lactose-free milk, taking lactase enzyme supplements, or consuming small amounts of milk with meals. There are also many non-dairy sources of calcium, vitamin D, and protein that can be incorporated into the diet.

4. Are there any long-term health consequences of lactose intolerance?

In most cases, lactose intolerance does not have any long-term health consequences. However, if an individual consistently avoids dairy products and does not get enough calcium and vitamin D from other sources, they may be at risk for osteoporosis and other nutrient deficiencies.

5. Can lactose intolerance develop later in life?

Yes, it is possible for lactose intolerance to develop later in life. This is known as secondary lactose intolerance and can be caused by certain medical conditions, such as celiac disease or Crohn's disease, or as a side effect of certain medications. It is important to consult a doctor if you suspect you have developed lactose intolerance.

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