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Double slit interference from antenna

  1. Jun 18, 2015 #1
    Consider the situation where the electrons in an antenna accelerate from the top of the antenna to the bottom of the antenna once, what would the interference pattern look like if the electromagnetic radiation from the antenna were passed through a double slit apparatus of an appropriate size? I imagine there would only be two deconstructive interferences in the interference pattern, is this wrong? The feynman path integral formulation seems to imply there would be more.
     
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  3. Jun 19, 2015 #2

    Drakkith

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    Staff: Mentor

    I believe it would look identical to the double slit pattern from any other source, be it visible light, electrons, or water waves.
     
  4. Jun 19, 2015 #3
    The number of regions that interfere deconstructively depends on how many crests and troughs there are, for my described scenario there should be one trough followed by one crest, which should result in only two regions which interfere deconstructively. Feynman's path integrals only seem to work with waves that have multiple crests and troughs
     
  5. Jun 19, 2015 #4

    Nugatory

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    A single pulse of electromagnetic radiation is a superposition of plane waves of various frequencies, so you have multiple crests and troughs here; you do the sum across all frequencies on all paths to get the final amplitude.

    You need to be able to work this problem using classical E&M before you can take on the quantum version.
     
  6. Jun 19, 2015 #5
    I see, thankyou.
     
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