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Drawings and sketches

  1. Dec 6, 2014 #1
    I am in high school now and need some help...My teacher always saids that the best way to learn formulas and solving the problem is by making a sketch. I know how to make it but thats about it. If someone knows how to study and solve problems that way,please help. Thanks:)
     
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  3. Dec 6, 2014 #2

    CWatters

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    That's a very general question as there are lots of different types of drawings or sketches you can do. What sort of problems are you studying at the moment?

    Drawings can help you visualise how vectors (such as forces) act on objects. Frequently to solve these problems you need to be able to add together vectors to work out what the overall (resultant or net) effect is on the object. Perhaps start by looking at the polygon or graphical method of vector addition...

     
  4. Dec 6, 2014 #3
    Right now I'm working with forces,speed,acceleration,freefall and such and I memorize the formulas but I can't put them in any context even tough I can see the missing variable sometimes it is not correct.
     
  5. Dec 6, 2014 #4

    CWatters

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    Next time you get stuck perhaps try posing the question in the homework section with an attempt at a diagram/solution.
     
  6. Dec 6, 2014 #5

    Danger

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    I am going to mention something here that a lot of people are going to give me grief over, but it has to be done for the sake of accuracy.
    In the terminology of draughting, a "drawing" is something created with tools such as the draughting machine or T-square, adjustable triangle, compass and pencil (or, these days, maybe a computer). A "sketch" is a freehand creation, no matter how accurate it may be. I do at least 80% of my designing in my head and another 19% on cocktail napkins, fast-food bags, etc. Only when I have a clear picture of what I want do I record it in TurboCad or Inkscape. (My draughting table and equipment are in storage. :oldfrown:) Some might think that such is horrendously primitive, but it's at least 1,000 times faster than using a computer and several Gb of paper storage fits in my shirt pocket.
    This might seem like just annoying nit-picking, but they are clearly defined terms in that area of endeavour and so should be used as such when dealing with professionals.
    CWatters: I love that clip. What program is he using? I've never seen anything quite like that.
    Mateosrica, I realize that you aren't a draughting student, so please don't take this to be a snipe at you. The only reason that I brought it up was because of the clip that showed both operations being done on the same screen at the same time.
     
    Last edited: Dec 6, 2014
  7. Dec 8, 2014 #6

    CWatters

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    Sorry, no idea what the program is.
     
  8. Dec 8, 2014 #7

    Danger

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    Bummer. :oldfrown: It looks really cool.
     
  9. Dec 8, 2014 #8

    sophiecentaur

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    @Danger
    You quaint ol'fashioned thing!
    I agree that drawing a straight line on paper takes not very long. Drawing 20 lines, with correct length and at the correct angle, then copying and pasting that object ten times is far quicker on a computer. I did the drawings for my Conservatory on a not very sophisticated program called Cadintosh. I started it all wrong (unlike a real draughtsman) without setting sizes and scales correctly. But, after starting again 'properly', I just raced through it. The kit that was supplied, using my drawings, was spot on.
    If you know about draughting already then you would find it a doddle - it's just the initial steps that are the pain. (Just the same as when you learn a new programming language.) You can do it my boy - go for it and build your own conservatory / observatory / playroom / office block.
     
  10. Dec 8, 2014 #9

    Danger

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    Hi, Sophie. Really, I was just trying to clarify the terminology because it does make a difference when discussing the matter. As for the pencil and paper being quicker, it does depend upon what I'm doing. I mean primarily in the sketching aspect. If I want a picture of something like, say, the guts of a 4-speed transmission to maybe explain to someone how a shifter works, I can whip it up in one minute or less on a napkin. It would probably take me at least a week in TurboCad. Programs don't make allowance for shortcuts of the kind that I'm used to. For instance, I sketch a bolt by putting 2 sawtooth zigzag lines beside each other with some diagonal slashes between them to represent threads. Add a few rectangles for the shank, head and flats, and Bob's your uncle. I've tried doing things fast on a computer, with Illustrator, Inscape, TurboCad, even Paint when I was at work and stuck with a Windows-burner, and it never worked. I have an open-source thing called Sketch-Up from SourceForge that might do it, but I haven't had a chance to try it out yet. Also, at present I'm restricted to my trackpad. I've killed yet another mouse, and I'm still waiting for delivery of my newest graphics tablet that I ordered almost 2 months ago. (All of my peripherals die the same way; the cords keep breaking. :()
     
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