Dumb question about conductors in electric field

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sophiecentaur
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This rather depends on what the man is attached to. If he is hanging from an insulating rope then he will 'charge up' due to his own capacitance and the PD between him and the battery. The amount of charge he can acquire can be enough to kill him as it flows through him to the various parts of his body (which started at a low initial voltage, relative to Earth). There are occasions when people do not die from high voltage contact when the current happens to pass through a limb and not the brain or heart.
When he is inside the cage, the metal suit is such a low resistance that there can be only a tiny PD between any two parts of the man. Hence, virtually no current will flow through his body.
Dalespam has already explained (much more patiently than I often do) that the suit is effectively in parallel with the man inside and shunts any current. He also explained that the man, outside the suit is in series with it. The suit resistance is so low that it is the same as if he just touched the wire when outside, in fact.
Do not apologise about things - just act more sensibly and read + take on board --in detail -- what people are telling you. (If you actually want to learn something)
 
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When he is inside the cage, the metal suit is such a low resistance that there can be only a tiny PD between any two parts of the man. Hence, virtually no current will flow through his body.
Dalespam has already explained (much more patiently than I often do) that the suit is effectively in parallel with the man inside and shunts any current. He also explained that the man, outside the suit is in series with it. The suit resistance is so low that it is the same as if he just touched the wire when outside, in fact.
Do not apologise about things - just act more sensibly and read + take on board --in detail -- what people are telling you. (If you actually want to learn something)

Aha...I get it,I think - no matter what example do we take (Faraday cage or metal suit) the man inside of it will not feel anything at all because he is is in parallel with the suit (I'm assuming that we could even pretend that he is not a part of the circuit) then the wire takes most amount of current but if he is in series with it (touching the circuit from the outside) then the amount of current going both through the suit and human is the same - that's why touching the electrified suit or the cage outside of it is dangerous.

Am I right now?
 
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sophiecentaur
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Am I right now?
Pretty much.
Once the suit has been connected to the cable and settled down. If the supply is DC then the man could probably get out of the suit and be OK as long as the wire is well away from Earth. If it is close then the E field (Volts per metre) could be problematical.
 
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Dale
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I think that if we attach the entire suit to the battery and put a man inside of the suit,the current will only go through the suit back to the battery and this cycle repeats again and again,does this mean that the man is not a part of the circuit and that's why he's not electrocuted?
Yes. There is a path which involves the man. It goes battery-suit-man-suit-battery. There is also a path which does not involve the man. It goes battery-suit-battery. That is why the connection is a parallel connection. There are multiple alternative paths.

The suit path has much lower resistance than the suit-man-suit path, so most of the current goes that way.
 
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sophiecentaur
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The suit path has much lower resistance than the suit-man-suit path, so most of the current goes that way.
The low suit resistance will ensure that, whatever current is flowing (up to hundreds of Amps) the PD across any two parts of the inside of it, which the wearer may be touching, will only be a few Volts maximum - harmless.
There are a dozen ways of looking at this problem and there is no limit to possible scenarios but the same basics apply and they are the same for basic Resistor - Capacitor networks, once you get the model right.
 
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