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Economic Problems

  1. Taxes

    3 vote(s)
    10.7%
  2. Fuel/Oil Prices

    2 vote(s)
    7.1%
  3. Wage issues

    1 vote(s)
    3.6%
  4. Foreign trade/trade deficit

    2 vote(s)
    7.1%
  5. Unemployment/jobs

    2 vote(s)
    7.1%
  6. Gap between rich and poor

    3 vote(s)
    10.7%
  7. Lack of Money

    0 vote(s)
    0.0%
  8. Federal budget deficit/federal debt

    8 vote(s)
    28.6%
  9. Corporate corruption

    4 vote(s)
    14.3%
  10. High cost of living/inflation

    3 vote(s)
    10.7%
  1. Apr 20, 2005 #1

    SOS2008

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    I wasn't sure if this should be posted in Economics under Social Sciences, however in reading this, I wondered what PF members think regarding these economic issues:

    More stats to follow later...
     
    Last edited: Apr 20, 2005
  2. jcsd
  3. Apr 21, 2005 #2

    PerennialII

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    I put a vote for the "gap between rich and poor", and even though may receive "banter" for it (I do believe in its existence .... don't strike me with the black and white option of what is in the other end :biggrin: ) and it's not as current or quarterly problem as many of the other options, from this batch I do see it as a systemic problem (why rating it above else), which when as drifted as nowadays impacts and leads to a large number of other societal problems.
     
  4. Apr 21, 2005 #3

    russ_watters

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    Staff: Mentor

    Interesing to see a vote for unemployment being a "problem". How 'bout some stas on that...

    http://nidataplus.com/lfeus1.htm#annl
     
  5. Apr 21, 2005 #4

    Pengwuino

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    I voted for inflation just to confuse people
     
  6. Apr 21, 2005 #5

    Nereid

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    SOS, I assume by 'this country' you mean 'the USA'?
     
  7. Apr 21, 2005 #6
    I would have to go with the budget deficit. Inflation, investment, trade deficit, and currency value are all affected by it. Deficits run up from "supply side" economic tax cuts also cause the gap between the rich and the poor to grow larger. Although investment makes up about 1/10 of the total GDP for the economy, investment is the major cause of economic cycles since it is very volatile and sensitive to other factors such as the budget deficit.
     
    Last edited: Apr 21, 2005
  8. Apr 21, 2005 #7
    Though I doubt it is the most important economic indicator at this current time, I selected foreign trade/trade deficits, but then I see outsourcing of jobs and even illegal immigration included in this (though also a part of unemployment/jobs).
     
  9. Apr 21, 2005 #8

    SOS2008

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    Yes, this pertains to the U.S. After I posted this, I edited it to say it may belong under another section of the forum because it is of a domestic rather than global nature. Also, the poll is based on the same categories of a Gallop Poll, as it was my thought to compare these results with PF votes.
     
  10. Apr 21, 2005 #9
    I find high oil prices extremely positive. The higher they get, the more people will press for alternative sources of energy, and thus a greater amount of resources will be put into researching and developing alternatives to oil, or more efficient ways of transportation than the venom the automobile is. High oil prices are a dream for environmentalists.

    Unemployment and taxes are low, so they are not a worry. Outsourcing is a sign of a very healthy world economy, a reflection of the spectacular growth and development of China, India, and most of the rest of east asia, which hold more than half of our species. In the US, this relfects the natural cycle of moving from simple manufacturing to more knowledge-content economic activities. This is why education is so important, and accountabiliy and results in teaching so critical in moving to the next stage of American economic life. Teacher unions and the Democrats must not be allowed to water down the quality and quantity of education kids get. Also Republicans must understand that generously funding education is the best investment a nation can make.
     
  11. Apr 21, 2005 #10

    Nereid

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    OK, thanks. I changed 'this country' to 'the US'.
     
  12. Apr 21, 2005 #11
    It would be nice if this higher cost of living would result in alternative energy. Too bad the petroleum companies have thwarted efforts to date. Now it will be all the more difficult because even if vehicles can be produced quickly to use alternative fuels, the infrastructure (logistics) of providing it cannot be done so quickly. In the meantime, the poor will struggle even more to make ends meet.
    For whom? For example, many high-tech jobs have been lost, and though these people who have lost their jobs have eventually found new jobs in other industries, they are making much less now. The statistics do not show this, nor do the stats take into account that many still remain unemployed but are no longer eligible for unemployment. With regard to taxes, the middle class continues to carry the tax burden, while the poor keeps getting poorer.
    Apparently you do not have to worry about your job. How nice for you.
    Yes, let's hope the Republicans will prevent the evil teachers and Democrats from ruining education for kids.
     
  13. Apr 21, 2005 #12
    If we still depend upon oil its not because of some conspiracy, but because the public simply don't give a damn about the environment, and don't want to give up their precious cars and SUVs for other means of transportation (such as public). And politicians don't make a big deal out of it because they know people aren't going to respond enthusiastically to an "Apollo Program" to be free from oil in ten years. The higher petroleum prices go, the greater the economic incentive to privately produce an alternative, and the greater the pressure and cost on stupid people who want to drive Nature into oblivion.

    Good!! Poisoning MY planet should not come cheap.

    Unemployment IS low (from the OECD):

    "In the Euro area, the standardized unemployment rate was 8.9% in December 2004, 0.1 percentage point higher than the previous month but the same rate as a year earlier. The United States' standardized unemployment rate for January 2005 fell to 5.2%, 0.2 percentage point lower than the previous month and 0.5 percentage point lower than a year earlier."

    A recent study by Nobel Laureate Lawrence Klein suggests that by 2008 outsourcing will have created 317,000 net new jobs in the US. That should appease selfish nationalists, but global capitalism's main achievement will be to lift half of humanity out of poverty, as the China example most strikingly proves.

    That is the oldest economic fallacy in the books. Average worker real income increased twenty-fold in the course of the past century. The only regions in the world where people's income actually go down are Sub-Saharan Africa and a few communist-totalitarian countries like North Korea.

    Well, Democrats are the ones fighting testing and accountability of any kind, and promoting "social promotion" of kids who end up graduating from high schools not knowing the basics in science, math or language skills. Unless you are ready to defend the propositions that there should be no measuring of school's performance and no real consequences for negligent schools and teachers, then yes, "evil teachers' unions and Democrats are ruining education for kids".
     
    Last edited: Apr 21, 2005
  14. Apr 21, 2005 #13
    Do you really believe the public wouldn't prefer clean energy if given the choice? The case of the trolly system that once existed in Los Angeles that was purchased by a petroleum company, and dismantled and replaced with buses, didn't happen? And politicians are not influenced by campaign contributions from big business, such as oil companies?

    I recall a report on the news that reviewed how the unemployment statistics do not show a complete, true picture. I know two people who have been displaced and are now making half of what they used to earn.
     
  15. Apr 21, 2005 #14
    People would also LOVE to look like supermodels and TV stars, yet you don't see them easing up on those triple burgers.
     
  16. Apr 21, 2005 #15
    Sorry, but this analogy misses by a long shot. I have to believe that most people try very hard to keep from paying high bills, and unfortunately public transportation, if available, doesn't solve many people's requirements. And busses are an example of public transportation that relies on petroleum.
     
  17. Apr 21, 2005 #16

    Pengwuino

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    The problem is its not just a "choice", its a sacrifice. Thats like asking some people "Would you like a clean house or a dirty house". Pretty simple answer right? What would happen if you tell them "But you need to clean it yourself or pay someone to clean it for you" then all of a sudden its not so clear. Hydrogen technology is still in its infancy. Hybrid technology has major drawbacks in the United States. You get on a freeway for a long trip and your electric engine just became a big hunk of useless metal. And have you ever gone onto a trolly system? Unless you live at a very specific area and want to go to another very specific area, trollies are useless. Buses don't have this pre-destined/unchangable route problem. No conspiracy there, just common sense. The worlds problems cant be blamed on a single interest group unfortunately.

    And the "hidden picture" of unemployment is useless in an argument. The "hidden picture" of the statistics has always existed since the first stat was generated and it exists in every country so you pretty much have 1 stat to go off of and no "hidden picture" can really affect it.

    You also might want to note in your "petroleum company conspiracy" that buses and other forms of public transportation are usually one of the first group of vehicles to get into new technologies. In my city, they were the first (or second... ive seen UPS use it for a while) to use natural gas vehicles, the first to use hybrid technologies, and the first to use hydrogen power.
     
    Last edited: Apr 21, 2005
  18. Apr 21, 2005 #17

    SOS2008

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    For those who have supported the Bush/Republican administration yet feel compelled to preach about the environment, particularly to liberals (often otherwise known as environmentalists), briefly:

    Bush's misrepresentation of the facts seem designed to mislead the American public about the actual effect of this policy; by reinstating the Global Gag Rule, we will see more, not fewer abortions. And:

    I'm sure I could find more of the same, but suffice it to say that Bush is hardly known as an environmentalist, nor the Republicans in general, and flippantly throwing claims about without sources is not constructive.
     
    Last edited: Apr 21, 2005
  19. Apr 22, 2005 #18
    OK, so instead of invalidating any of the specific arguments (preachings) that have been presented in this thread, it suffices to be known that since one doesn't officially belong to the "liberal=environmentalist" gang one must be wrong.
     
  20. Apr 22, 2005 #19

    SOS2008

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    No. It's only to note the irony (contradiction), but more importantly the lack of sources for claims being made.
     
  21. Apr 22, 2005 #20

    loseyourname

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    Like almost everyone else, I voted for the budget deficit, mostly because nothing seems to be getting done about it. I almost felt compelled to vote for cost of living increases, however, as it strikes me at times as the most unfair of these conditions. Living in the Los Angeles area growing up afforded me the opportunity to see a huge real estate boom and, while its good for business and most homeowners, the raising of property taxes in proportion to land value is what really bothers me. People that worked hard to buy a house in a nice neighborhood and who may have even payed off the house being forced to move out when the prices shoot up and taxes becomes too high to afford is just flat out ridiculous. Ultimately, though, that's a combination of two options listed in taxation and cost-of-living inflation. Real estate booms by themselves are great.
     
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