Effect of Change of Potential difference applied to an X-Ray tube

In summary, the conversation discusses the basics of X-rays and the relationship between potential difference applied to an X-ray tube and the emitted radiation's wavelength and intensity. The Duane-Hunt law is mentioned, and the question of what happens to the intensity when the potential difference is increased is brought up. The conversation also mentions the importance of X-ray safety when working in a lab setting.
  • #1
Bloopy
13
1
I am a high school student, so I know only the basics of X-Rays.I simply know about continuous X-rays, cutoff wavelength and threshold wavelength. Now if I increase the potential applied to the X-ray tube, I am certain that the minimum wavelength of emitted radiation decreases. (I say this using λ=hc/eV, which is the Duane-Hunt law)

I am unsure about the intensity of emitted radiation. Does that change?
 
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  • #2
Bloopy said:
I am a high school student, so I know only the basics of X-Rays.I simply know about continuous X-rays, cutoff wavelength and threshold wavelength. Now if I increase the potential applied to the X-ray tube, I am certain that the minimum wavelength of emitted radiation decreases. (I say this using λ=hc/eV, which is the Duane-Hunt law)

I am unsure about the intensity of emitted radiation. Does that change?
Is this a general question, or are you working with X-rays in the lab? X-ray safety is an important consideration when working with lab setups.
 
  • #3
berkeman said:
Is this a general question, or are you working with X-rays in the lab? X-ray safety is an important consideration when working with lab setups.
As I said, I am in high school. There is no practical use of X-Rays. It is just the theoretical part. Actually, my textbook had a multiple choice question saying

"If we increase potential difference applied to an X-Ray tube, what of the following things will happen with the emitted radiation?
A. Intensity increases
B. Intensity decreases
C. Wavelength increases
D. Wavelength decreases.

Now, as I mentioned in the Original Post itself, I used the Duane-Hunt Law to mark the answer as D, which is obviously correct. Out of curiosity I wanted to know what would happen with the intensity. Since I myself did not have much knowledge regarding the issue, I decided not to put it under the homework section and just as a general question of Quantum Physics.
 
  • #4
Bloopy said:
I decided not to put it under the homework section and just as a general question of Quantum Physics.
Do you have two threads about this? If so, I can merge them into one thread in the schoolwork forums. We do not allow cross-posting here, and we do not allow schoolwork posts ourtide of the schoolwork forums. Thanks.
 
  • #5
berkeman said:
Do you have two threads about this? If so, I can merge them into one thread in the schoolwork forums. We do not allow cross-posting here, and we do not allow schoolwork posts ourtide of the schoolwork forums. Thanks.
No, I didn't create two threads. Just this one.
 

Related to Effect of Change of Potential difference applied to an X-Ray tube

What is the potential difference applied to an X-Ray tube?

The potential difference applied to an X-Ray tube is the voltage difference between the cathode and anode. It is typically in the range of 50,000 to 150,000 volts.

How does the potential difference affect X-Ray production?

The potential difference applied to an X-Ray tube determines the energy of the electrons that are accelerated towards the anode. Higher potential differences result in higher energy electrons, leading to higher energy X-Rays being produced.

What happens when the potential difference is increased?

When the potential difference is increased, the speed and energy of the electrons also increases. This results in a higher intensity of X-Rays being produced, leading to a brighter and more detailed image.

What is the relationship between potential difference and X-Ray wavelength?

The potential difference applied to an X-Ray tube is directly proportional to the wavelength of the X-Rays produced. This means that as the potential difference increases, the wavelength of the X-Rays decreases.

How does changing the potential difference affect X-Ray imaging?

Changing the potential difference applied to an X-Ray tube can affect the contrast and resolution of the X-Ray image. Higher potential differences can result in better contrast and resolution, but can also increase the risk of overexposure to radiation.

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