Electromagnetic Waves and different energy manifestations

In summary, the conversation discusses the relationship between temperature and the movement of particles, the concept of electromagnetic waves and their creation through the acceleration of charged particles, and the role of antennas in receiving and transforming electromagnetic waves into electricity. The question of what defines the wavelength or frequency of an electromagnetic wave is raised, as well as the relationship between energy and frequency. The conversation also touches on the concept of quantum mechanics and how it differs from classical physics.
  • #1
GuillemVS
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1
When an object is hot its particles are moving faster than when is cold, right?

I've searched that particles are electrons and protons, so it means that if we warm a object the electrons will be moving or even accelerating. Every charge accelerated creates Electromagnetic Waves (or light), right? So it means that when a object receives energy, the electrons become excited, and in it's energy release they go down from excitement, and that becomes acceleration of electron that eventually becomes an Electromagnetic Wave, right?

So basically we could define a mirror by saying that all the light that comes excites de electrons of the mirror and its dexcitement (is that a word?) creates acceleration of the electron so it's creating the electromagnetic waves back.

Now here is my question (apart from the right?s): What defines the wavelength (or frequency) of the electromagnetic wave? Is it the acceleration itself? Or it's a fixed acceleration in which it comes back to dexcited (word?), so then it would be defined by the amount of energy that it has in its excitment? Is every equal wavelength electromagnetic wave at the same level of energy?

Another thing: antennas receive electromagnetic waves as electricty, how is this excitement transform into electricity? if that's how it happens?
Like I believe that the electrons get excited by the receive of enegy, right?, then how is tranformed into electricity? If the electrons instead of dexciting they just move into another place (because that's electricty, right?, the movement of electrons)?

Apart from the theory, antennas receive EM waves as electricity, so: what defines the voltage of the electricity and what EM wave (type of frequency) we receive? I saw that monopoles antennas receive frequencies depending on their length (as dipole but x2) using that 468 feet / x Mhz. I guess that is to fit the wavelength in the antenna? If it's that, what about all the others wavelengths that are smaller and fit in? The only thing that's left of discard is that the amount of volts received define the wavelength depending on your antenna length. More antenna length less volts for the same wavelength, is that true?

I mean, I guess if you haven't destroyed all your vains and nails already for how I have destroyed science and physics with my theories, it would be great if you could tell me where I am wrong (I guess it's faster to tell me where I am right xD), I need answers.

Thank you in advance for reading.

P.S: I don't know what prefix should I use for this, so I put the intermediate one. But I guess this could be too in Basic.
 
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  • #2
GuillemVS said:
Now here is my question (apart from the right?s): What defines the wavelength (or frequency) of the electromagnetic wave acceleration? Is it the acceleration itself? Or it's a fixed acceleration in which it comes back to dexcited (word?), so then it would be defined by the amount of energy that it has in its excitment? Is every equal wavelength electromagnetic wave at the same level of energy?
I don't know what you mean by electromagnetic wave acceleration, but here's the basics:

Light is electromagnetic radiation (or electromagnetic waves) that is visible to our eyes. Furthermore, electromagnetic radiation fundamentally consists of the quanta of the electromagnetic field called photons.

This is the basic formula which describes the relation between energy and frequency (and thus different colors of light):
http://hyperphysics.phy-astr.gsu.edu/hbase/mod2.html#c3

Here's a Sixty Symbols video about Planck's constant and electromagnetic radiation:

Planck's Constant - Sixty Symbols
and here's a brief demonstration of the energy levels of hydrogen (the hydrogen spectrum).
 
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  • #3
DennisN said:
I don't know what you mean by electromagnetic wave acceleration, but here's the basics:

Light is electromagnetic radiation (or electromagnetic waves) that is visible to our eyes. Furthermore, electromagnetic radiation fundamentally consists of the quanta of the electromagnetic field called photons.

This is the basic formula which desribes the relation between energy and frequency:
http://hyperphysics.phy-astr.gsu.edu/hbase/mod2.html#c3

Here's a Sixty Symbols video about Planck's constant:

Planck's Constant - Sixty Symbols
and here's a brief demonstration of the energy levels of hydrogen (the hydrogen spectrum):

Oops remove the acceleration part from that. And add the context of aceleration of particle with charge.
 
  • #4
GuillemVS said:
Every charge accelerated creates Electromagnetic Waves (or light), right?
Yes. But at the atomic level, things are different. The electron in the ground state in a hydrogen atom does not emit electromagnetic radiation. If it did, the electron would lose energy and spiral into the nucleus. But it does not; the hydrogen atom, along with many other types of atoms, is stable. The electrons in atoms are not orbiting the nuclei in a classical way. And thus we here have quantum mechanics instead of classical physics :smile:. Atoms emit radiation when the electrons go from a higher, excited energy state to a lower. And they can absorb incoming radiation and go from a lower to a higher excited state.

Edit:
For more info, see also this page: Failures of Classical Physics.
 
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  • #5
DennisN said:
Yes. But at the atomic level, things are different. The electron in the ground state in a hydrogen atom does not emit electromagnetic radiation. If it did, the electron would lose energy and spiral into the nucleus. But it does not; the hydrogen atom, along with many other types of atoms, is stable. The electrons in atoms are not orbiting the nuclei in a classical way. And thus we here have quantum mechanics instead of classical physics :smile:. Atoms emit radiation when the electrons go from a higher, excited energy state to a lower. And they can absorb incoming radiation and go from a lower to a higher excited state.

Edit:
For more info, see also this page: Failures of Classical Physics.
Thanks for the information ^^
 
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1. What are electromagnetic waves?

Electromagnetic waves are a type of energy that is made up of oscillating electric and magnetic fields. They can travel through space and carry energy from one place to another, without the need for a medium.

2. How are electromagnetic waves different from other types of waves?

Unlike mechanical waves, such as sound waves, electromagnetic waves do not require a medium to travel through. They can also travel at the speed of light and have a wide range of wavelengths and frequencies.

3. What are the different types of electromagnetic waves?

The electromagnetic spectrum is divided into several types of waves, including radio waves, microwaves, infrared, visible light, ultraviolet, X-rays, and gamma rays. Each type has a different wavelength and frequency, which determines its energy and how it interacts with matter.

4. How do electromagnetic waves interact with matter?

When electromagnetic waves encounter matter, they can be absorbed, reflected, or transmitted. The type of interaction depends on the properties of the material and the wavelength of the wave. For example, visible light is absorbed by plants for photosynthesis, while X-rays can pass through soft tissues but are absorbed by bones.

5. What are some practical applications of electromagnetic waves?

Electromagnetic waves have a wide range of practical applications, including communication (radio waves, microwaves), heating (infrared), vision (visible light), medical imaging (X-rays, MRI), and sterilization (UV). They are also used in technology such as cell phones, GPS, and satellite communication.

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