1. Limited time only! Sign up for a free 30min personal tutor trial with Chegg Tutors
    Dismiss Notice
Dismiss Notice
Join Physics Forums Today!
The friendliest, high quality science and math community on the planet! Everyone who loves science is here!

Electrostatic force on a charge

  1. Aug 26, 2009 #1
    i was reading the book of Griffin - introduction to electrodynamics. it is written that the force of charge q on Q is not only depends on the distance b.w them but also the velocity & acceleration of charge q.then i think coloumb'law is incomplete at all. it must include some quantity for velocity or acceleration. ian't it right??????????
    hope for this >>>>>>>>
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Aug 26, 2009 #2

    olgranpappy

    User Avatar
    Homework Helper

    Yes, "coloumb'law" is incomplete. This incompleteness is a topic within the field of electrodynamics (note the phrase *dynamics* as opposed to statics), an introduction to which is presumably given in the book you mentioned.
     
  4. Aug 26, 2009 #3

    clem

    User Avatar
    Science Advisor

    Yes. If you go further on in the book, you will get to the Lienard-Wiechert potentials which replace Coulomb's law for moving and accelerating charges.
     
  5. Aug 26, 2009 #4

    jtbell

    User Avatar

    Staff: Mentor

    The dependence of the force on the velocity of q is usually called "magnetism." :biggrin:
     
  6. Aug 26, 2009 #5
    yes it may right like it is something electromagnetic force b.w the particles, then why didn't coloumb mention it in his Law???????
     
  7. Aug 27, 2009 #6

    berkeman

    User Avatar

    Staff: Mentor

    Isn't Coulomb's Law confined to electrostatics? That might be why...

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Coulomb's_law

    No v or a in his equation that I can see...
     
  8. Aug 27, 2009 #7

    olgranpappy

    User Avatar
    Homework Helper


    The man's name is Coulomb not "coloumb". He studied electricity a long time ago... He didn't get *everything* exactly right but he got pretty close. Cut the man some slack. Geez.
     
  9. Aug 27, 2009 #8

    jtbell

    User Avatar

    Staff: Mentor

    Because at the time Coulomb did his work, the velocity-dependent force hadn't been discovered yet!
     
Know someone interested in this topic? Share this thread via Reddit, Google+, Twitter, or Facebook




Similar Discussions: Electrostatic force on a charge
  1. Electrostatic forces (Replies: 2)

Loading...