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Electrostatic force on a charge

  1. Aug 26, 2009 #1
    i was reading the book of Griffin - introduction to electrodynamics. it is written that the force of charge q on Q is not only depends on the distance b.w them but also the velocity & acceleration of charge q.then i think coloumb'law is incomplete at all. it must include some quantity for velocity or acceleration. ian't it right??????????
    hope for this >>>>>>>>
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Aug 26, 2009 #2

    olgranpappy

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    Yes, "coloumb'law" is incomplete. This incompleteness is a topic within the field of electrodynamics (note the phrase *dynamics* as opposed to statics), an introduction to which is presumably given in the book you mentioned.
     
  4. Aug 26, 2009 #3

    clem

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    Yes. If you go further on in the book, you will get to the Lienard-Wiechert potentials which replace Coulomb's law for moving and accelerating charges.
     
  5. Aug 26, 2009 #4

    jtbell

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    The dependence of the force on the velocity of q is usually called "magnetism." :biggrin:
     
  6. Aug 26, 2009 #5
    yes it may right like it is something electromagnetic force b.w the particles, then why didn't coloumb mention it in his Law???????
     
  7. Aug 27, 2009 #6

    berkeman

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    Isn't Coulomb's Law confined to electrostatics? That might be why...

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Coulomb's_law

    No v or a in his equation that I can see...
     
  8. Aug 27, 2009 #7

    olgranpappy

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    The man's name is Coulomb not "coloumb". He studied electricity a long time ago... He didn't get *everything* exactly right but he got pretty close. Cut the man some slack. Geez.
     
  9. Aug 27, 2009 #8

    jtbell

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    Because at the time Coulomb did his work, the velocity-dependent force hadn't been discovered yet!
     
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