Energy transfer in electromagnetic induction

  • Thread starter entropy15
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  • #76
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In addition to BruceW's point above, I would like to point out that the two statements are not mutually exclusive. Specifically, it is possible that the statements "there is a limit to the energy that can be transferred" and "we can increase the energy transferred by increasing the number of turns" can both be true.
How is that possible?
 
  • #77
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How is that possible?
Like this (ignore the scale and units of the vertical axis, this is just to give a general idea of the concept of a monotonically increasing function with a horizontal asymptote)
1-s2.0-S0022509608001993-gr8.jpg

If each dot represents the energy extracted by a coil with i turns then it is both true that "there is a limit to the energy that can be transferred" and "we can increase the energy transferred by increasing the number of turns".
 
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  • #78
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Like this (ignore the scale and units of the vertical axis, this is just to give a general idea of the concept of a monotonically increasing function with a horizontal asymptote)
Thanks for clarifying. This seems to indicate that the amount of energy transferred converges to a fixed value as N (no. of turns) tends to infinity.

Is this because the successive turns in the coil are linked to lesser magnetic flux?
 
  • #79
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Yes, it is because each turn reduces the flux seen by the other turns. This can be seen through the superposition principle.

Suppose that you have two turns, consider them to be two separate loops. There is a current in loop A which creates a field which opposes the change in the external field. By superposition the field seen by loop B is the sum of the field from loop A and the external field, which is less than the change in the external field. So the current induced in B is a function of the external field and the current induced in A where current in A reduces the induced current in B.

Then, to consider the loops as separate turns in a single coil simply equate the current in A to the current in B.
 
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