Dismiss Notice
Join Physics Forums Today!
The friendliest, high quality science and math community on the planet! Everyone who loves science is here!

Explosion in space

  1. Mar 4, 2009 #1
    Friday Febury 20th, 2009.
    NASA's Fermi telescope has spotted an massive and gigantic explosion in space which is detected to be roughly the largest gamma-ray burst ever.
    The blast put off three to five thousand billion times that of visible light.
    Scientists beleive that the blast occured about 12.2 light years away from Earth.
    Amazing, isn't it?

    -Derek
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Mar 4, 2009 #2

    mathman

    User Avatar
    Science Advisor
    Gold Member

    Could you give a reference? The distance looks much too close.
     
  4. Mar 4, 2009 #3

    Nabeshin

    User Avatar
    Science Advisor

    Probably missed a billion there, because to the best of my knowledge, I am not dead.
     
  5. Mar 4, 2009 #4

    mgb_phys

    User Avatar
    Science Advisor
    Homework Helper

    http://www.sciencecodex.com/nasas_fermi_telescope_sees_most_extreme_gammaray_blast_yet [Broken]

    Hey, whats a factor of 10^9 between friends.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 4, 2017
  6. Mar 4, 2009 #5
    I think your mixed up, this news is from NASA, I directly read this over roughly fifteen times, I even created a report for my project at school on it. I have not typoed anything, nor have I left out a "billion".

    -Derek
     
  7. Mar 4, 2009 #6
    Oh yes, Sorry, I did make an mistake.
    Wow, I must be tired tonight.
    Yes, I did typo. 12.2 billion lightyears away.
    Sorry for the misunderstanding.
    -Derek
     
  8. Mar 4, 2009 #7
    Yes, I typoed.

    The correct calculation is 12.2 billion lightyears away.
    Sorry for the misunderstanding,
    -Derek.
     
  9. Mar 4, 2009 #8

    Nabeshin

    User Avatar
    Science Advisor

    Even if it was directly from NASA, I would still say they're wrong :smile:
     
  10. Mar 5, 2009 #9
    but it certainly would be interesting to have such a peculiar object which made that GRB only 12,2 ly away (well, not mentioning the Earth sterilisation side-effect...)
     
  11. May 2, 2009 #10
    Thank you Thank you Thank you. I reported a large single light in the sky to the Astronomy group that night it was very bright and increased in size to about the size of a quarter then shrank down to about the size of a pencil eraser then slowly went out. I never heard anything from them back as to what it was. I was right I though it was a huge explosion in space. I wish they had emailed me and told me I was not crazy. Again Thank you thank you thank you. I hate to say it but I smoke and my family does not let me smoke in the house so I go out at all times of the night which is why I was out side when I saw the fireball very late at night.
     
  12. May 2, 2009 #11

    Nabeshin

    User Avatar
    Science Advisor

    This was a gamma ray burst, so unless your eyes are sensitive to gamma rays...
     
  13. May 2, 2009 #12

    mgb_phys

    User Avatar
    Science Advisor
    Homework Helper

    If you release several hundred times the total lifetime energy of the sun in a few minutes in Gamma rays you are going to light up the sky in every waveband.

    Although only the nearest GRBs are naked eye objects eg GRB080319B
     
  14. May 2, 2009 #13

    Nabeshin

    User Avatar
    Science Advisor

    Yeah I don't think this particular one would be visible to the naked eye though, seeing as it's ~13B ly away.
     
  15. May 3, 2009 #14
    I remember in my science class back , my teacher would say stuff like , star wars has very little true facts about science, their is no sound of explosion ins space. THen amake a relevant connection to todays pop culture like Star Wars. XD
     
  16. May 3, 2009 #15

    Jonathan Scott

    User Avatar
    Gold Member

    Well, I've heard a hiss and crackle noise at exactly the same time that I saw a meteor, which seemed scientifically impossible after I thought about it, as the sound should take minutes to reach me. However, I later found that that this is a widely known effect, and there's a theory that meteors induce intense radio waves around audible frequencies and these can in turn induce vibrations in materials, causing corresponding sounds to be emitted locally. This same idea could therefore be used as a scientifically plausible excuse for being able to hear distant explosions in space (but I still don't think you'd hear a GRB from 13 billion years ago).
     
  17. May 4, 2009 #16

    Chronos

    User Avatar
    Science Advisor
    Gold Member

    The 'nothing' in intergalactic space means it is an exceedingly poor medium for sound wave propogation. The crackle pop of a meteor is not surprising. They ionize and push shock waves through the atmosphere resulting in sound and em waves,
     
  18. May 4, 2009 #17
    It might just be that I overlooked it, but, does anyone know what caused the explosion and what it was that exploded?
     
  19. May 4, 2009 #18
    12.2 billion light years, isn't that about the age of the universe?
     
  20. May 4, 2009 #19
  21. May 4, 2009 #20

    mgb_phys

    User Avatar
    Science Advisor
    Homework Helper

    It was a Gamma Ray Burst (GRB) these are probably very early high mass (and so short lived) stars collapsing and forming black holes.
     
Know someone interested in this topic? Share this thread via Reddit, Google+, Twitter, or Facebook