Extracting data from a spectrometer to Excel

In summary, the software used to save the files is OceanView, and the software to extract information from the files is Laser beam with HR4000 spectrometer. However, when trying to convert the data from .ocv to excel using the same instrument and software with different light sources, the data is unreadable with the laser beam but can be converted with the yellow light.
  • #1
Hayool
14
0
Good morning,

I used the Laser beam with HR4000 spectrometer with Ocean View software when saving the files it is saved by (.ocv) format. when trying to extract information to excel I get some unreadable data like (bkg thin sheet gel.png) attached. I used the same instrument and software with the yellow light but used solution of the mix not gelatine sheets, and i was able to convert it using excel but with the laser and gelatine sheet this is what I got I could not convert it.
This is the link i used to convert the data

Please help.
Thanks
 

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  • #2
Just a guess, but .ocv sounds like "Ocean View," so it might be a proprietary file format from the company. To import into Excel, it has to be ASCII data, like the .csv (Comma Separated Values) mentioned in the link.
 
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  • #3
DrClaude said:
Just a guess, but .ocv sounds like "Ocean View," so it might be a proprietary file format from the company. To import into Excel, it has to be ASCII data, like the .csv (Comma Separated Values) mentioned in the link.
Hi Drclaude.
When I used the yellow light I was able to convert it to from .ocv format to excel from this link
https://www.chem.utoronto.ca/coursenotes/CHM317/pdfs/Import Spectrum to Excel.pdf
but when I used the laser beam I got this
213053-66087f6d9d1c248bf3b4f8d358006f23.png

So, I am confused why I was able to have the data when I used the yellow light but could not when using the laser beam
 

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  • #4
You have to make sure that you are choosing the right file type when exporting from the spectroscopy software.
 
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  • #5
DrClaude said:
You have to make sure that you are choosing the right file type when exporting from the spectroscopy software.
In the spectroscopy software I only have one option of(.ocv) format nothing else.
 
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  • #6
Hayool said:
In the spectroscopy software I only have one option of(.ocv) format nothing else.
If it worked for one it should work for the other - it's the same software, right? OceanView? On page 44 of the manual it has a picture of the dialog box, with "ascii" selected...
 
  • #7
The PK at the beginning strongly suggests it is a compressed file. Have you tried opening it with a compression software?

BoB
 
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  • #8
rbelli1 said:
The PK at the beginning strongly suggests it is a compressed file. Have you tried opening it with a compression software?

BoB
Good catch! (I can't even read the screenshot!) That's the header for zip files; the initials of the inventor.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Zip_(file_format)#History
 
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Related to Extracting data from a spectrometer to Excel

1. How do I export data from a spectrometer to Excel?

To export data from a spectrometer to Excel, you will need to use the software provided by the manufacturer of your spectrometer. This software should have an option to export data in a compatible format for Excel. Once you have selected this option, you can then open the exported file in Excel.

2. What file format should I use when exporting data to Excel?

The most common file format for exporting data from a spectrometer to Excel is a comma-separated values (CSV) file. This format is compatible with Excel and can easily be imported into a spreadsheet for further analysis and manipulation.

3. Can I customize the data that is exported to Excel?

Yes, most spectrometer software will allow you to select which data points and parameters you want to export to Excel. This can be useful if you only need specific data for your analysis or if you want to reduce the size of the exported file.

4. How can I ensure the accuracy of the exported data?

To ensure the accuracy of the exported data, it is important to calibrate your spectrometer before taking measurements. This will ensure that the data being exported is as accurate as possible. Additionally, double-checking the data after it has been exported can help identify any potential errors.

5. Are there any limitations to exporting data from a spectrometer to Excel?

Some spectrometer software may have limitations on the amount of data that can be exported at one time, or the types of data that can be exported. It is best to check the user manual or contact the manufacturer for any specific limitations of your spectrometer's software. Additionally, large amounts of data may cause slow performance or crashes in Excel, so it is important to be mindful of the size of the exported file.

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