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Fast switching between two input powers

  1. May 8, 2016 #1
    Hi

    Anyone knows of an electric component that can switch between two input powers.

    I have two DC input power,s one is 10V/2A and the second is 12V/2A . I want to be able to switch between the two without interrupting the function of my circuit . meaning without my circuit going off in between the switch.

    output can be 6V/2A (I am Flex)

    Just wanted to know what is the name of this electric component that can witch between the two without dropping power . I guess it is a fast switch with some kind of a capacitor . if you have a link to the actual component that would be very helpful .

    Thank You

    B
     
  2. jcsd
  3. May 8, 2016 #2

    mfb

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    Many transistors can switch in nanoseconds, with a reasonable capacitor the voltage doesn't fluctuate in any relevant way during that timescale.

    If your output is at lower voltage, you need some electronics to get the voltage down anyway, I guess you can start there.
     
  4. May 8, 2016 #3
    Hi mfb.

    thank you for the quick reply !

    i have been looking for a long time now , but still can't find one that takes two inputs . can you direct me to one that does on the http://www.mouser.com [Broken] ?

    thank you

    B
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 7, 2017
  5. May 8, 2016 #4

    NascentOxygen

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    Hi benofer90. You have mentioned 3 voltage levels here, and also indicated a capacitor will smooth over the changeover. Then it seems there may be a moment where it's possible that one of your sources could find it is connected to a capacitor charged to a voltage exceeding that of the supply itself. To prevent damage, you'll need to make sure the supplies can tolerate this; otherwise, a diode may offer sufficient protection.

    You are wanting to manually swap between supplies, but to incur no interruption when doing so? What circuit or device is your load?
     
  6. May 8, 2016 #5

    anorlunda

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    How about a make-before-break double pole relay. You can choose electromechanical or solid state.
     
  7. May 8, 2016 #6
    i have two power sources:
    1) 10V/2A battery
    2) 12V/2A battery
    3) LED

    i want to connect the LED to a switch that is connected to the two power sources .
    i will trigger the switch with a little signal(power) , so the switch default is the 10V/2A battery , once triggered it will switch to 12V/2A battery
     
  8. May 8, 2016 #7

    NascentOxygen

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    Will the trigger signal remain present for all the time that the 12V is in use? What voltage is that trigger signal and what circuit does it originate from?
     
  9. May 8, 2016 #8
  10. May 8, 2016 #9
    Will the trigger signal remain present for all the time that the 12V is in use?
    i can go either way . either keep the signal or not

    What voltage is that trigger signal
    i can work with any v up to 12v

    and what circuit does it originate from?
    manually activated . external circuit . meaning i will switch the signal from a separate power source .
     
  11. May 8, 2016 #10

    berkeman

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    Have you found "Diode OR" in your Google searches for circuits?
     
  12. May 8, 2016 #11

    anorlunda

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  13. May 8, 2016 #12

    NascentOxygen

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    I'm wondering why you are fastidious about not interrupting the current to the LED even momentarily. I mean, is anyone going to notice? People will probably notice a slight step change in its brightness during the changeover, anyway?
     
  14. May 8, 2016 #13

    Baluncore

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    Connect the 10V/2A supply to the load with a power diode. If voltage drop is a problem use a Schottky power diode.
    Connect the 12V/2A with a physical on/off switch. For electronic control, replace the physical switch with a power MOSFET.
    The diode will keep the 10V/2A supply connected while switching the 12V/2A supply.
     
  15. May 8, 2016 #14
    okay i made a little diagram . maybe this will clear things out ... ?
    is there such a component?

    image.png
     
  16. May 8, 2016 #15
    i think that would be fine ? I'm looking at the data sheet and can find instructions with respect to switching or connectivity

    so if i want to drop the V like in this digram i will need one more component at the output of the first component ?
    image.png
     
  17. May 8, 2016 #16
    yes but can i get it in one component ?

    image.png
     
  18. May 8, 2016 #17

    berkeman

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    When you diode OR, it is usually one diode per supplying rail, hence two diodes in your case.
     
  19. May 8, 2016 #18
    any way i can find one component ? what should i be looking for in terms of google key words?
     
  20. May 8, 2016 #19
    anyone can help ??
     
  21. May 8, 2016 #20

    Baluncore

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