FB friend suggestion

  • Thread starter EngWiPy
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@sysprog, You are correct that I miswrote about "giving one's Facebook password to a third party website". But that's a technicality--the result is often the same as if one had shared much of one's Facebook data such as Contact lists with the third party. The password itself is not shared; instead, the OAuth protocol makes sure you are logged into Facebook, then shows the user a little notice (first time used only) about what data will be shared--WHICH NO ONE ACTUALLY READS, or perhaps if they read it, they don't understand it--and then OAuth sends the third-party website a token that the website uses to gain restricted/limited access to some of your account information, usually consisting of your name, email address, gender and so on. The "and so on" is actually, usually, a lot more information. See this article for example: https://www.bbc.com/news/technology-46618582

The problem is, that in order to use third-party website logons via Facebook, you must have enabled, on your Facebook account, the "Apps and Websites" feature, and the DEFAULT behaviors associated with this feature share a whole lot of data about each user. One can further restrict what is shared, to a point, but Facebook is constantly changing the way its Settings feature lets you interact to protect your own data. So, IMO, the only way to safely use Facebook at all is to keep the "Apps and Websites" feature turned off altogether. It is on by default. It is this feature that allowed Cambridge Analytica to mine so much helpful data during the last election cycle, without people realizing it.
Fair enough, harborsparrow.

For my own part, I stay away from the social media sites (no fb, twit, etc.) and although I use gmail, and sometimes make youtube comments, I don't use google to sign on anywhere else.

You may possibly find it gratifying that the fb interface doesn't always work well --
https://developers.facebook.com/support/bugs/
 
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For the record, I didn't log into any third party website via Facebook. As I mentioned before, I permanently deleted my previous Facebook account (Facebook added this feature recently. Before you couldn't do that. You could only deactivate your account), and didn't use any phone number in the new one (besides using a new email address). So, logically, there is no obvious way to link the two accounts (one of which is supposed to be DELETED. GONE!!). But this is FB. They don't remove anything. They sell everything. I think they used my MAC/IP address, as this is the only thing common between the two accounts. Anyway, deleting Facebook was one the best decisions I have made :biggrin:
 
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For the record, I didn't log into any third party website via Facebook. As I mentioned before, I permanently deleted my previous Facebook account (Facebook added this feature recently. Before you couldn't do that. You could only deactivate your account), and didn't use any phone number in the new one (besides using a new email address). So, logically, there is no obvious way to link the two accounts (one of which is supposed to be DELETED. GONE!!). But this is FB. They don't remove anything. They sell everything. I think they used my MAC/IP address, as this is the only thing common between the two accounts. Anyway, deleting Facebook was one the best decisions I have made :biggrin:
If you used the same browser as before, on the same machine, the most likely culprit is leftover cookies from your prior account.
 

harborsparrow

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I use Facebook to keep in touch with farflung relatives, friends and former colleagues, but using it has become a nuisance that I put up with. In my Facebook account I regularly go into the Settings and tighten the screws. I am certain they mine data from it, but I don't post anything that I require to be private anyway. I keep the Apps turned off, do not run the Facebook app on my mobile phone (use Firefox from phone), run a good ad blocker in my browser, and even a couple of browser add-ons to discourage Facebook tracking me. I sync my browsers so they all get those addons. I constantly Unfollow or permanently Hide nuisance posters. It is only barely worth it, as I still have to dig thru a lot of drivel to see posts from my actual connections. I go there far less often too. Still, it has allowed me to reconnect with high school friends from far away and long ago. Use if you need that, but with cautions.
 
when you create an account on this platform you are automatically agree all their privacy policy and terms of service (which 99% users didn't even bother to read) and this companies will have legal access to all your cookies and data. FB even keep your phone contact list if you are using their app. So be careful
 
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Facebook is reported to be on the verge of getting a penalty from the FTC (Fed. Trade Commission) over privacy violations: https://www.cnet.com/news/facebook-ftc-reportedly-negotiating-massive-fine-to-settle-privacy-issues/
Yesterday, Berkely ICSI faculty member Serge Egelman posted another of his writings, this one about Android apps that, along with storing your current non-persistent (changeable in regular settings) "ad ID", also store persistent identifiers such as "IMEI, WiFi MAC address, SIM card serial number, etc." and the "Android ID", for purposes of selling the identifying information (mainly to advertisers).

Following the link at the bottom of that page leads to this:
https://blog.appcensus.mobi/2018/09/10/tiny-lab-responds/
and from there, the bottom link leads to this:
https://blog.appcensus.mobi/2018/05/14/apps-sending-location-secretly/

The MFs are not only collecting kids' personal data, they're following kids around with GPS and trying (ineptly) to be surreptitious about it -- that is truly beyond creepolian.
 
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DaveC426913

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These companies are manipulative. You cannot possibly expect users to read pages and pages in Terms and Conditions in vague terms before you register. It's ridiculous.
Keep in mind that services such as Facebook are free, and no one is putting a gun to anyone's head.

Though you may not want to admit it, you are making a decision about the benefits of Facebook versus the cost to your privacy. You have implicitly decided that the benefit is worth the cost.
 
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Keep in mind that services such as Facebook are free, and no one is putting a gun to anyone's head.

Though you may not want to admit it, you are making a decision about the benefits of Facebook versus the cost to your privacy. You have implicitly decided that the benefit is worth the cost.
The problem with this reasoning is that the user doesn't have a choice. He/she either fully gives up their privacy, or don't use the application, and make yourself isolated. Twitter is a free application, too, but Facebook is very aggressive in what and how they do business. They are under investigation and a potential fine for a reason.
 

DaveC426913

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The problem with this reasoning is that the user doesn't have a choice.
Of course they do.

What they can't do is have their cake and eat it too. TANSTAAFL.

He/she either fully gives up their privacy, or don't use the application, and make yourself isolated.
No. Just what fraction of people do you think are not on Facebook at all?
Just in my circle of friends - and Iive in a major megatropolis - it's about 50%.


Twitter is a free application, too, but Facebook is very aggressive in what and how they do business.
They can't do any business with people who don't agree to have business be done with them by signing up. In fact, you have to actively go and find them to sign up. Again, no gun to your head.

Don't get me wrong - I sympathize with you. I'd like to see their privacy incursions curtailed too. But let's not pretend we don;t go into it willingly and with our eyes wide open.
 
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...no gun to your head.

...
That's correct. That's why I am off Facebook. I can live without it. But the point I was trying to make from this whole thread is that we need political decisions to contain these giants on how they use users' data. Their terms and conditions should be aligned with a well-defined privacy conditions. They shouldn't be allowed to define what digital privacy is. I think the free stuff has some negative impact. It's allowed an intrusive business model. I don't know if we can change that, though.
 

DaveC426913

Gold Member
18,237
1,843
That's correct. That's why I am off Facebook. I can live without it. But the point I was trying to make from this whole thread is that we need political decisions to contain these giants on how they use users' data. Their terms and conditions should be aligned with a well-defined privacy conditions. They shouldn't be allowed to define what digital privacy is. I think the free stuff has some negative impact. It's allowed an intrusive business model. I don't know if we can change that, though.
It's changing. I think there's been an argument afoot that Facebook is beginning to serve as a primary news source for a significant fraction of the population.
That allows regulators to get a foot in the door. They are already leaning on Facebook about its manipulation of political news items.
 

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