Filaria: Why Lymphoedema Develops After Adult Worms Die

  • Medical
  • Thread starter rajeshmarndi
  • Start date
In summary, lymphedema is caused by a T cell mediated immune response to filarial antigen released when the worms die. This can also be exacerbated by secondary bacterial infections. Medication for filaria only kills microfilaria in the blood, but the adult worms remain in the lymphatic system and when they die, they release antigens that trigger the immune response leading to lymphedema. This can cause severe deformities in the affected area.
  • #1
rajeshmarndi
319
0
why after the filaria adult worms die you are prone to develop lymphoedema, instead one should get rid of the worm and the disease.

when one take medicine for filaria, it only kill the micro filaria in the blood and seems there is no lymphoedema as long the adult worm live in the lymphatic system. But lymphodema start once the adult worm live its lifespan and dies. Why?

Thanks.
 
Biology news on Phys.org
  • #2
When the worms die, their bodies don't just disappear! They stay in the lymph nodes and rot.
 
  • #3

Thanks for the reply.

Is a filaria patient who is under medication i.e microfilaria only in the blood get killed, but the adult worms are unaffected and remain in his lymphatic system. Is he also capable to spread the worm through mosquito bite?
When the worms die, their bodies don't just disappear! They stay in the lymph nodes and rot.

But other parasite/bacteria e.g malaria parasite are killed and removed from the body.
 
  • #4
rajeshmarndi said:
why after the filaria adult worms die you are prone to develop lymphoedema, instead one should get rid of the worm and the disease.

when one take medicine for filaria, it only kill the micro filaria in the blood and seems there is no lymphoedema as long the adult worm live in the lymphatic system. But lymphodema start once the adult worm live its lifespan and dies. Why?

Thanks.

The reason is that lymphedema (LE) is not caused directly by the living worm, but by a T cell mediated immune response to filarial antigen mostly released when the worms die. There are also secondary bacterial infections which either alone or together with the primary infection, stimulate the release of growth factors which can interfere with the normal generation of lymph vessels. Neonates born in endemic areas will have heavy pathogen loads, but few symptoms because of acquired factors which down-regulate the immune response. LE, in the extreme case, can cause grotesque deformities in the lower extremities (elephantiasis). http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2784903/
 
Last edited:
  • #5


I can explain that lymphoedema develops after adult filaria worms die because the worms cause damage to the lymphatic vessels while they are alive. The lymphatic vessels are responsible for draining excess fluid from the tissues, and when they are damaged by the worms, they become less efficient at doing their job. This leads to a buildup of fluid in the affected area, resulting in lymphoedema.

Additionally, the death of the adult worms triggers an inflammatory response in the body, which further damages the lymphatic vessels and can worsen the lymphoedema. This is why it is important to not only get rid of the worms, but also to address the damage they have caused to the lymphatic system.

Furthermore, it is important to note that while medication may kill the microfilaria in the blood, it may not always completely eliminate the adult worms. These worms can continue to cause damage to the lymphatic system even if they are not producing microfilaria. This is why it is crucial to follow a full treatment plan recommended by a healthcare professional to effectively eliminate the worms and prevent further damage to the lymphatic system.

In conclusion, lymphoedema develops after adult filaria worms die due to the damage they cause to the lymphatic vessels while they are alive. It is important to address both the worm infestation and the resulting damage to the lymphatic system in order to effectively treat and prevent lymphoedema.
 

Related to Filaria: Why Lymphoedema Develops After Adult Worms Die

1. What is filaria?

Filaria, also known as lymphatic filariasis, is a parasitic disease caused by thread-like worms that live in the lymphatic system of humans. These worms are transmitted through the bites of infected mosquitoes.

2. Why does lymphoedema develop after adult worms die?

Lymphoedema is a condition where there is swelling of the arms, legs, or other body parts due to the buildup of lymph fluid. This occurs after the adult worms die because their death causes a reaction in the body's immune system, leading to inflammation and blockage of the lymphatic vessels.

3. Can filaria be treated?

Yes, filaria can be treated with a combination of medications, including antiparasitic drugs to kill the worms and anti-inflammatory drugs to reduce the inflammation and swelling. However, treatment may not reverse any damage that has already occurred in the lymphatic system.

4. How is filaria prevented?

Filaria can be prevented by avoiding mosquito bites in areas where the disease is prevalent. This can be done by using insect repellent, wearing long-sleeved clothing, and sleeping under mosquito nets. Mass drug administration programs are also being implemented in some countries to prevent the spread of the disease.

5. Is filaria a common disease?

Filaria is considered a neglected tropical disease and is most commonly found in tropical and subtropical regions of Africa, Asia, and Latin America. It is estimated that over 120 million people are affected by filaria, with over 40 million people experiencing severe symptoms such as lymphoedema and elephantiasis.

Similar threads

  • Biology and Medical
Replies
6
Views
4K
  • Biology and Medical
Replies
4
Views
4K
  • Sci-Fi Writing and World Building
Replies
8
Views
2K
  • Sci-Fi Writing and World Building
Replies
18
Views
3K
  • Quantum Interpretations and Foundations
Replies
25
Views
2K
  • Art, Music, History, and Linguistics
Replies
1
Views
1K
  • Sci-Fi Writing and World Building
Replies
2
Views
1K
  • Sci-Fi Writing and World Building
Replies
9
Views
2K
Replies
62
Views
3K
Replies
8
Views
3K
Back
Top