Find the missing force when the boy is pulled

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In summary: F_1## and ##F_2## are forces in the horizontal direction. So, we can use Newtons law to find the magnitude and direction of the father's force.$$F_1 \cos(\theta) + F_2 \cos(35) = ma$$$$F_1 = 100 N + \cos(35)$$$$F_2 = 100 N - \sin(35)$$$$F_1 \cos(\theta) + F_2 \cos(35) = 100 N$$$$F_1 = 100 N + 8.5 m/s^2\\$$F_2 = 100 N - 8.
  • #36
kuruman said:
For these reasons, I would say that this problem is so-so formulated.
Very reasonable. I didn't even look at the numbers but I have now and I agree w/ you.
 
<h2>1. What is the missing force when the boy is pulled?</h2><p>The missing force when the boy is pulled is the force required to move the boy in the direction of the pull. It is the force that must be applied to overcome the resistance or inertia of the boy.</p><h2>2. How is the missing force calculated?</h2><p>The missing force can be calculated using the formula F = ma, where F is force, m is mass, and a is acceleration. The mass of the boy and the acceleration at which he is being pulled must be known in order to calculate the missing force.</p><h2>3. What factors affect the missing force when the boy is pulled?</h2><p>The missing force is affected by the mass of the boy, the acceleration at which he is being pulled, and any other forces acting on the boy such as friction or air resistance. The angle and direction of the pull also play a role in determining the missing force.</p><h2>4. How does the missing force affect the boy's movement?</h2><p>The missing force is directly proportional to the acceleration of the boy. This means that the greater the missing force, the faster the boy will move in the direction of the pull. If the missing force is too small, the boy may not move at all or may move very slowly.</p><h2>5. Can the missing force be negative?</h2><p>Yes, the missing force can be negative if the boy is being pulled in the opposite direction of his current movement. This can happen if there is a force acting on the boy in the opposite direction, such as friction or air resistance. In this case, the missing force would be a resistance force, rather than a force that causes movement.</p>

Related to Find the missing force when the boy is pulled

1. What is the missing force when the boy is pulled?

The missing force when the boy is pulled is the force required to move the boy in the direction of the pull. It is the force that must be applied to overcome the resistance or inertia of the boy.

2. How is the missing force calculated?

The missing force can be calculated using the formula F = ma, where F is force, m is mass, and a is acceleration. The mass of the boy and the acceleration at which he is being pulled must be known in order to calculate the missing force.

3. What factors affect the missing force when the boy is pulled?

The missing force is affected by the mass of the boy, the acceleration at which he is being pulled, and any other forces acting on the boy such as friction or air resistance. The angle and direction of the pull also play a role in determining the missing force.

4. How does the missing force affect the boy's movement?

The missing force is directly proportional to the acceleration of the boy. This means that the greater the missing force, the faster the boy will move in the direction of the pull. If the missing force is too small, the boy may not move at all or may move very slowly.

5. Can the missing force be negative?

Yes, the missing force can be negative if the boy is being pulled in the opposite direction of his current movement. This can happen if there is a force acting on the boy in the opposite direction, such as friction or air resistance. In this case, the missing force would be a resistance force, rather than a force that causes movement.

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