Finding the Inverse of Cabin Function

In summary, the conversation is about a math joke involving the integral of cabin to the negative first power. The answer is ln(cabin) + C, or "the natural log cabin plus C(sea?/see?)". The joke is not meant to be overanalyzed and there is no specific way to read the equation. Another joke is mentioned involving a fly and a mountain climber, with a hint about a scalar. The conversation also includes a definition of "vector" from the Oxford English Dictionary.
  • #1
polyb
67
0
[tex]\int (cabin)^{-1} = ?[/tex]


:biggrin::smile::biggrin:
 
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  • #2
hahaha, funny answer.. oh.. almost forgot the plus C. Oh, shouldn't it be [tex] \int(cabin)^{-1} dcabin? [/tex]
 
  • #3
It doesn't really matter. I borrowed this from Thomas Pynchon's 'Gravity's Rainbow' where he was discussing the graffiti on bathroom walls written by renegade mathematicians. :smile: I finally got around to sharing it with some people who would get the joke! :biggrin:
 
  • #4
alright, so I am retarded. What exactly is the joke? I think I get the punchline, but I just can't seem to put everything together so that it makes sense.
 
  • #5
The answer is [itex] ln(wood) [/itex] or something cheesy like that.
 
  • #6
Probably log cabin.
 
  • #7
Perhaps I am thinking of this as a "real" joke where one needs both a setup that makes sense and a punchline.

the answer is of course ln(cabin)+C which is "the natural log cabin plus C(sea?/see?)". What I do not get is the question "the indefinate integral of cabin to the negative first" or "the indefinate integral of one over cabin".

What I am asking is if there is suppose to be a certain way to read the equation so that it makes more sense.
 
  • #8
I think you're overanalyzing it narble. It's a quick easy funny joke. I always though x^-1 = 1/x anyways...

Either way, post some more out of the book please!
 
  • #9
[tex] cabin^{-1} = \frac{1}{cabin} [/tex]
 
  • #10
this is a similar type of math joke, but it has nothing to do with integrals.

Q: what happens when you try to cross a fly with a mountain climber?

hint: its amazingly corny
 
  • #11
Hint on T@P's joke: You'll never, ever get it.
 
  • #12
fly mountain climber sin theta
 
  • #13
[tex] \int(cabin)^{-1} dcabin = log \ cabin + C = houseboat[/tex]
 
  • #14
:smile: That's great!
 
  • #15
Something about a scalar? Thats my best guess for the mountain climber one.
 
  • #16
Yeah, something about a scalar. You'll never get it though.
 
  • #17
t!m, thanks for the hint.


Taken from the OED:
vector 3. a. Med. and Biol. A person, animal, or plant
which carries a pathogenic agent and acts as a potential source
of infection for members of another species.

You can't cross a vector with a scaler (scalar)

EOM
 

Related to Finding the Inverse of Cabin Function

1. What is the purpose of finding the inverse of a cabin function?

The inverse of a cabin function is used to reverse the input and output relationship of the original function. This means that for any given output, the inverse function can determine the corresponding input. It is useful in solving equations, graphing, and understanding the behavior of the original function.

2. How do you find the inverse of a cabin function?

To find the inverse of a cabin function, you need to follow these steps:
1. Replace f(x) with y.
2. Swap the x and y variables.
3. Solve for y.
4. Replace y with f^-1(x).
The resulting function will be the inverse of the original cabin function.

3. Can every cabin function have an inverse?

No, not every cabin function has an inverse. A cabin function must pass the horizontal line test, meaning that every horizontal line must intersect the graph of the function at most once. If a function fails this test, it does not have an inverse.

4. How do you graph the inverse of a cabin function?

To graph the inverse of a cabin function, you can use a graphing calculator or manually switch the x and y values for several points on the original function to get corresponding points for the inverse. Then, plot these points and connect them to form the graph of the inverse function.

5. Are there any real-world applications of finding the inverse of a cabin function?

Yes, there are many real-world applications of finding the inverse of a cabin function. For example, in finance, the inverse of the compound interest function is used to calculate the initial investment needed to reach a desired future value. In physics, the inverse of the position function is used to find the time at which an object will reach a specific position. It is also commonly used in engineering, economics, and other fields.

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