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Fluid mechanics study navier stokes

  1. Nov 6, 2013 #1

    joshmccraney

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    hey pf!

    i am studying fluid mechanics and we are reviewing navier/stokes equations. we have gone over a few problems, but i could definitely use practice on more. do you all have any suggestions that include solutions, not just answers, so if im stuck i can see how to solve?

    problems ideally are similar to this: https://engineering.purdue.edu/~wassgren/notes/NS_PracticeProblems.pdf [Broken]

    the kind of problems dealing with flow about plates, cylinders, and all that.

    thanks!

    josh
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 6, 2017
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  3. Nov 6, 2013 #2

    joshmccraney

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    for the record, the above hyperlink was something i found that was really good but no solutions. its definitely not from my class
     
  4. Nov 6, 2013 #3
    A lot of these problems are solved in Bird, Stewart, and Lightfoot, Transport Phenomena. Are you not using Bird as a text at Purdue?

    Chet
    A U of Michigan grad
     
  5. Nov 6, 2013 #4

    boneh3ad

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    Bird, Stewart, and Lightfoot is common in some fields like chemical engineering, but in my experience, other fields tend to treat other authors as the holy grail of fluids texts. A lot of aerospace programs, for example, use Anderson's series of textbooks ("Introduction to Flight", "Fundamentals of Aerodynamics", and "Modern Compressible Flow") for the introductory fluids courses. Most upper-level courses on viscous flow seem to use White's "Viscous Fluid Flow", which is an absolutely phenomenal book. Mechanical engineering at UIUC used Munson, Young, and Okiishi for their introductory fluids course when I was there (apparently this book has a slightly different author list now).
     
  6. Nov 6, 2013 #5

    arildno

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    Thumbs up for White!
    It was "my" book on viscous fluid flow as well.
     
  7. Nov 6, 2013 #6

    boneh3ad

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    Yeah. I'd definitely recommend White. It is a bit pricey though unless you can find a good deal on a used copy. It seems the price has practically doubled since I bought it, and that was only, perhaps, 5 or 6 years ago. It also has a fair number of solutions of the Navier-Stokes equations if I recall. It won't have things like the OP's example of water flowing down a wall touching air, but once you understand the basics like Couette flow, that is an easy problem anyway.

    So yeah, to the OP, the book in question is this one: Viscous Fluid Flow by White.

    A word of warning, though. It does have the basic examples worked out like Couette flow and Hagen-Poiseuille flow, but it doesn't have any exercises or other standard examples, as it is really meant as more of a graduate text and reference text, but its coverage of viscous fluid flow is phenomenal.

    A similar text would be Boundary-Layer Theory by Schlichting. It has another comprehensive set of worked out basic flows but it again is more of a graduate/reference text and doesn't have any additional examples.

    Otherwise, some of the other undergraduate-type texts like Transport Phenomena by Bird, Stewart, and Lightfoot (as Chestermiller recommends), Fundamentals of Fluid Mechanics by Munson, Rothmayer, Okiishi, and Huebsch, or https://www.amazon.com/Fundamentals...ical-Aerospace-Engineering/dp/0073398101[/url may be more what you are looking for depending on which discipline you are studying. Maybe check your school's library for these books as they are very common and will certainly be available as long as they aren't already checked out. You would also need to find a solutions manual for these if you want the answers to the exercises though.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 6, 2017
  8. Nov 6, 2013 #7

    arildno

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    Although it is, more relevant for applications for inviscid fluid flow modelling, rather than NS, I cannot avoid recommending Newman "Marine Hydrodynamics" as well.
    Damn pricey, though.
     
  9. Nov 6, 2013 #8

    pasmith

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  10. Nov 6, 2013 #9

    boneh3ad

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    I suppose I should also toss out Fluid Mechanics by White. I don't have any personal experience with this book, but White's other books (e.g. Viscous Flow) are high quality and I have heard good things about it.
     
  11. Nov 6, 2013 #10

    joshmccraney

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    thanks for the replies and suggestions! i actually don't go to purdue; i just found the link from google. also, our class is currently using white's viscous fluid flow. i feel i have a good understanding but would like to be able to check my work through the problem to ensure my logic is correct.
     
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