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Free download of any book ever written (real not spam)

  1. Oct 9, 2015 #1

    BWV

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    if you can find it:

    https://libraryofbabel.info

    Site also has any book that ever will be written
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Oct 9, 2015 #2
    It is just combination of characters and didn't give any information. Do you think this can be real "book"?
     
  4. Oct 9, 2015 #3

    lisab

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    It isn't as interesting as cat videos :wink:.
     
  5. Oct 9, 2015 #4

    mfb

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  6. Oct 9, 2015 #5

    BWV

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    Maybe its a real book in another language?
     
  7. Oct 9, 2015 #6

    mfb

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    It is not. Unless you count "languages I made up just to fit this random string of letters".

    Oh, and the website does not have any Chinese book. Or any book with a different alphabet at all.
     
  8. Oct 9, 2015 #7

    BWV

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    It could be code. Somewhere there is a book with the key

    A phonetic Chinese version of everything ever written in both Wade-Giles and Pinyin can be found there.
     
  9. Oct 9, 2015 #8
  10. Oct 9, 2015 #9
    I think it's an interesting idea, but it's hopelessly useless. The odds of finding even a coherent sentence are nill, which makes the whole thing rather boring. Even for just a 100 character string, (which is as long as this post up to the word 'coherent'), there are about 10143 possible combinations, just using letters and spaces. A minimum you'd need about 64 bytes to encode 100 characters using a 27 letter alphabet, which means you'd need ~64x10143 bytes of information to store all combinations. That's more storage than there are atoms in the universe.
     
  11. Oct 9, 2015 #10

    BWV

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    Not completely useless if it made the subject of a great short story
     
  12. Oct 9, 2015 #11
    I don't get it, when I search for a word the only thing it shows are blank pages with the word written on it, while the other pages in the 'book' are filled with random strings. Shouldn't that word be in a similar page with random strings?
     
  13. Oct 9, 2015 #12

    Daz

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    I think I need to cut down on my drinking! I got up to page 36 of one of those books before I realized it was complete gibberish.
     
  14. Oct 9, 2015 #13

    collinsmark

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    It looks like the stored characters are limited to lowercase letters, commas, periods, and spaces.

    So, if that's true, if this "library" does contain J.D. Salinger's The Catcher In the Rye, (which I'm guessing it might/does), it would only contain a version of it where all capital letters are first converted to lower case; colons, semicolons, parenthesis, brackets, dashes, quotation marks, special characters and new-lines are omitted; and all formatting of text is removed.

    In other words, nearly all punctuation is removed. I think it would be pretty hard to read a book without any punctuation except for periods, commas and spaces.
     
    Last edited: Oct 9, 2015
  15. Oct 9, 2015 #14

    BWV

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    There are versions where all the missing punctuation is spelled out like 'colon here'
     
  16. Oct 9, 2015 #15

    collinsmark

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    True, except without the single quotes as you used. Some other convention would have to be developed to signal a punctuation direction, to distinguish them from the actual text.

    'Still pretty hard to read.

    And when all is said and done, if certain punctuation symbols are desired, it may be more efficient (and certainly more robust) to add in the desired punctuation symbols into the valid characters. A hit would be taken in terms of compression efficiency, but likely not as much as adding in the punctuation convention "code" using only lowercase letters, commas and periods. That, and having punctuation symbols as valid characters would take care of special cases where actual text in the book actually corresponds with a convention "code." (E.g.. what if one of the characters in the book actually wanted to say [before compression], "... and the teacher said, 'no Davy, don't put the colon at the beginning of the sentence. Put the colon here.'")
     
  17. Oct 9, 2015 #16

    BWV

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    I wonder that as well, if Borges had added three or four more characters it would not have changed the order of magnitude of the size of the library: 25^(1.3*10^6) vs 28^(1.3*10^6). Was it more for the reader's sake?
     
  18. Oct 9, 2015 #17

    collinsmark

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    Essentially, given the same indexing scheme as already present, adding additional characters would effectively reduce the maximum book size (but so would using "codes" to indicate punctuation). Of course you could split a real book into several smaller books.

    Ultimately what this comes down to -- regardless of how many legal decompressed characters there are -- the index to the book is merely the compressed version of the book itself. When plugging in the book's index you're really just typing in the compressed version of the book, where the full compression involves more than just reducing the number of valid characters, but also character mapping into a more efficient storage format. Then the "book" it returns is the decompressed index, limited of course to its relatively small set of legal characters.

    Btw, I just noticed that numerals (i.e., 0 - 9) don't seem to be valid characters either in the current implementation.
     
  19. Oct 9, 2015 #18

    BWV

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    Yes that was a theme of Borges - for example the 1:1 scale map in
    On exactitude in science
     
  20. Oct 10, 2015 #19

    mfb

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    Expressing colons with lowercase letters is no problem. Let "special char colon" be a colon, "special char exclamation mark" be an exclamation mark and so on. If the book text should contain "special char", write "special char special char". Can be shortened to save space, of course.
    The same is frequently done with character escaping for programming languages, e.g. how do you add quotation marks to a string that is delimited by quotation marks, or how do you add a backslash to a string where the backslash indicates an escape sequence (like \n for a new line)? Same solution.
     
  21. Oct 10, 2015 #20

    wolram

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    Im looking for a book call isjamgon but could not find it.
     
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