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Full-wave antenna

  • Thread starter Solarmew
  • Start date
  • #1
37
1

Homework Statement


antenna.JPG

Homework Equations


see attached image


The Attempt at a Solution


I'm not sure where to begin with this one. We did a similar problem with a half-wave antenna, where I=I_0 cos(2πz/λ) and it was centered at the origin, so cos = 1 when z = 0.
So here I figured if we place the antenna in the positive z, then sin will = 0 when z = 0, then max out half way and decrease back to 0. But i'm not really sure.

Could someone please nudge me in the right direction?
 

Answers and Replies

  • #2
TSny
Homework Helper
Gold Member
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If you know the field of a single half-wave antenna, then you just need to add the fields from the two half-wave antennas that make up the full-wave antenna. You will need to take into account that the two currents in the half-wave antennas are out of phase and there is an additional phase shift due to the path difference from the antennas to the far-field observation point (like the path difference in a double-slit apparatus). Phasors are a good tool for adding the two fields.
 

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