Fundamental Theorem of Calculus

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Homework Statement



All this information is in the attached file.

Homework Equations



All this information is in the attached file.


The Attempt at a Solution




What I tried to do was take the anti-derivative of the first equation and plug in the number 5. I'm not sure if that was the way to go so I then just plugged in 5 off the get-go and got 13. Not sure what the question is asking and I would appreciate some guidance.

Thanks
 

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Answers and Replies

  • #2
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Homework Statement



All this information is in the attached file.

Homework Equations



All this information is in the attached file.


The Attempt at a Solution




What I tried to do was take the anti-derivative of the first equation and plug in the number 5. I'm not sure if that was the way to go so I then just plugged in 5 off the get-go and got 13. Not sure what the question is asking and I would appreciate some guidance.

Thanks
If you have concluded that F(5) = 13, then no, that is incorrect. For that part you should NOT attempt to get the antiderivative.
 
  • #3
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So the anti-derivative is only applicable to parts b and c?
 
  • #4
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You should not attempt to get the antiderivative in any of the three parts. For part b, you'll need to use the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus. Note that there are two parts of this theorem.
 
  • #5
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The book says to use the second part of the theorem but I'm not seeing how it would work in this question. Do I plug in the x in place of t?
 
  • #6
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You're talking about part a, right? What definite integral is represented by F(5)?
 
  • #7
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√5^2 + 144?
 
  • #8
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√5^2 + 144?
No.
Show me what the definite integral looks like. If you quote this post you should be able to reuse this integral.

$$F(5) = \int_?^? \sqrt{t^2 + 144}~dt $$
 
  • #9
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No.
Show me what the definite integral looks like. If you quote this post you should be able to reuse this integral.

$$F(5) = \int_5^5 \sqrt{t^2 + 144}~dt $$

Is it that?
 
  • #10
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Yes. Now, what is the value of that integral? That is what F(5) equals. Don't overthink this.
 
  • #11
SammyS
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ralfsk8,

In general, what does the definite integral,
[itex]\displaystyle \int_{a}^{b}\, f(x)\,dx[/itex]​
represent?
 
  • #12
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Mark 44 - I would say either 13 or 0, but as you mentioned earlier, 13 isn't the answer.

SammyS - The area under the curve bounded by the x-axis of a graph and 2 vertical lines (a and b)
 
  • #13
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What are the vertical lines for this integral?
 
  • #14
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The vertical lines for this integral are 5 and x
 
  • #15
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That's for F(x). You're trying to determine F(5). So what are the vertical lines now?
 
  • #16
STEMucator
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An easy way to remember the fundamental theorem is to consider :

Let :

[itex]F(x) = \displaystyle \int_{b(x)}^{a(x)}\, f(t)\,dt[/itex]

Then :

[itex]\frac{d}{dx}F(x) = \frac{d}{dx} \displaystyle \int_{b(x)}^{a(x)}\, f(t)\,dt = f(a(x))a'(x) - f(b(x))b'(x)[/itex]

It's simply a plug and play formula.
 
  • #17
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Mark44 - The vertical lines are now 5 and 5. So we're not trying to calculate the area of anything if it's the same line?

Zondrina - Ah yes, that does seem familiar to me
 
  • #18
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Mark44 - I would assume 5 to 5 which would make it the same line right?

Zondrina - Ah yes, that does seem familiar
 
  • #19
STEMucator
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Mark44 - I would assume 5 to 5 which would make it the same line right?

Zondrina - Ah yes, that does seem familiar

Also think about this F(5) thing, it's MUCH easier than it looks. Imagine you're integrating from one line a to another line b. What if those two lines are the same? Then there really is no area between them right?

A simple example is to consider :

[itex]\int_{z}^{z}xdx[/itex]

Where z is ANY real number or function or anything really, but to keep it simple let z = 1,2,3...... and notice no matter what you're going to get the same answer. Then come back to your F(5) question.
 
  • #21
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Okay so I've narrowed it down to either 0 or 5...
 
  • #23
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Well just like Zondrina said, if both of the vertical lines have the same value, then there shouldn't be area, deeming it 0.

As for the 5... I actually have no clue
 
  • #24
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Well just like Zondrina said, if both of the vertical lines have the same value, then there shouldn't be area, deeming it 0.

As for the 5... I actually have no clue

OK, then what's your answer for F(5)?
 
  • #25
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My final answer is 0.
 
  • #27
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Do I take the anti-derivative and plug in 5?
 
  • #28
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Do I take the anti-derivative and plug in 5?

No you use that plug and play i posted on the first page. Memorize it as it is your best friend to solve questions like these within a minute.
 
  • #29
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ralfsk8 said:
Do I take the anti-derivative and plug in 5?

No. Here's what I said back in post #4.
You should not attempt to get the antiderivative in any of the three parts. For part b, you'll need to use the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus. Note that there are two parts of this theorem.
 
  • #30
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No you use that plug and play i posted on the first page. Memorize it as it is your best friend to solve questions like these within a minute.
IMHO, memorizing that formula is NOT a good idea, especially if that memorization comes at the expense of understanding.
 

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