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Gas solubility in gas versus liquid

  1. Oct 2, 2015 #1
    Hopefully this question makes sense; when talking about solubility of a gas does this have any relation to its ability to mix with another gas?

    i.e. gas solubility in gas, versus, gas solubility in liquid

    In ultrasonic cavitation some say that a more soluble gas can more easily enter the bubble from the liquid and cushion the collapse of the bubble, others say a more soluble gas is more able to leave the bubble into the liquid. The latter makes sense to me, the former does not. Why should a gas dissolved in a liquid be more able to enter a gaseous bubble in the liquid because of it being "more soluble".

    Any ideas / comments welcome!
     
    Last edited: Oct 2, 2015
  2. jcsd
  3. Oct 2, 2015 #2

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    Kinetics of solution: steam traps/lines "rattle" when air free, the "latter" case.
     
  4. Oct 2, 2015 #3
    Thanks for the reply! Could you elaborate a little? Which part of this relates to solubility?
     
  5. Oct 2, 2015 #4

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    "Steam" is very soluble in water (infinitely) is it not --- so much so, that two phase aqueous systems (zero dissolved gases) rattle in containers rather than sloshing.
     
  6. Oct 2, 2015 #5
    Okay, I'm not familiar with the terms "rattling" and "sloshing" so I'm a little confused. Let me ask it this way;

    If you use a syringe to 'push' a soluble gas into a liquid, the rate at which it would be able to be pushed would increase with solubility.

    If you now use a syringe to 'extract' the gas from the liquid would it's solubility influence the rate at which you could do it? I'm assuming not.

    Apologies this question may not make much sense, I'm just formulating on what I've read in some papers.
     
  7. Oct 2, 2015 #6

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    How rapidly do carbonated beverages go "flat?" Or, does household ammonia stop reeking of ammonia? Compare those hours/days to reach equilibrium with the rate of evolution of nitrogen bubbles in the blood streams of divers.
     
  8. Oct 2, 2015 #7
    Okay, I have Friday afternoon mental block but I think I see what you are saying; yes there is a difference.
     
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