Gauge Bosons and the Pion Particle

In summary, The pion is not considered a gauge boson because it does not have a gauge symmetry like other gauge bosons do. It is a meson, which means it is a strongly interacting particle with two valence quarks. Pions are also pseudo-Nambu-Goldstone bosons of the strong isospin group, and are not related to Yang-Mills fields.
  • #1
trv
73
0
Quick question. If particles that mediate interactions are called gauge bosons, why isn't Pion considered a gauge boson. I'm pretty sure I've come across a few interactions mediated by it.
 
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  • #2
I think you could say that pion is a gauge boson of chiral symmetry.
 
  • #3
yeah, but it has nothing to do with gauge there - rather you would say that it is a goldstone boson.
 
  • #4
gauge bosons also have spin 1, while the goldstone boson is spin 0.

it's not right to think of gauge bosons as "particles that mediate interactions" - all particles can "mediate interactions" of a sort. It's called a gauge boson because the field has a "gauge symmetry" (just like the electromagnetic field).
 
  • #5
Just realized that the pion is a meson. So I assume now that the two aren't mutually exclusive. I.e. a meson can also be a boson, or at least a goldstone boson.
 
  • #6
trv said:
Just realized that the pion is a meson. So I assume now that the two aren't mutually exclusive. I.e. a meson can also be a boson, or at least a goldstone boson.

You are mixing things up..

Boson is the opposite to fermion, a boson has integer spin, a fermion has half-integer spin.

Meson means that it is a strongly interacting particle with two valence quarks (one quark, and one anit-quark)

All Mesons are bosons, but not all bosons are mesons ...
 
  • #7
If I remember correctly, pions are the pseudo-goldstone bosons when chiral symmetry is broken.
 
  • #8
kuon said:
If I remember correctly, pions are the pseudo-goldstone bosons when chiral symmetry is broken.

I am sure I do not remember it correctly, but it seemed to me that pions were the gauge bosons of the isotopic symmetry group (Yang-Mills fields).

Bob_for_short.
 
  • #9
Bob_for_short said:
I am sure I do not remember it correctly, but it seemed to me that pions were the gauge bosons of the isotopic symmetry group (Yang-Mills fields).

Bob_for_short.

No, that's wrong. The (strong) isospin symmetry group is a global symmetry, so there are no gauge bosons.

The pions are (pseudo) Nambu-Goldstone bosons of the strong isospin group.

Definitely not Yang-Mills.
 

1. What are gauge bosons?

Gauge bosons are force-carrying particles that mediate the fundamental forces of nature, such as the electromagnetic force, strong nuclear force, and weak nuclear force. They are responsible for transmitting these forces between particles.

2. What is the role of gauge bosons in the Standard Model of particle physics?

In the Standard Model, gauge bosons play a crucial role in explaining the fundamental interactions between particles. They are responsible for maintaining the symmetry of the theory and are essential for understanding the behavior of particles at the subatomic level.

3. What is the significance of the pion particle?

The pion particle, also known as the pi meson, is a type of meson that is composed of a quark and an antiquark. It was the first meson to be discovered and played a crucial role in the development of the theory of strong interactions. It also has a significant role in the study of nuclear forces and the structure of atomic nuclei.

4. How are gauge bosons and the pion particle related?

Gauge bosons and the pion particle are both fundamental particles that are described by the Standard Model of particle physics. While gauge bosons are responsible for mediating forces between particles, the pion particle is one of the particles affected by these forces. They are also both examples of bosons, which are particles with integer spin.

5. Can gauge bosons and the pion particle be observed in experiments?

Yes, both gauge bosons and the pion particle have been observed in experiments using particle accelerators, such as the Large Hadron Collider. These experiments have provided valuable insights into the behavior of these particles and their interactions with other particles.

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