Getting a Job Abroad: Tips & Advice for Finding Employment in Other Countries

  • Thread starter Mépris
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In summary: That way, you can get a job in X while you still have your degree. In summary, you should go to school in country X and try to get a job while you still have your degree.
  • #1
Mépris
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Hi,

I wanted some information as to how one should proceed to get a job in country X when he is in country Y, which is a 15-hour plane ride away.

The easy way would be doing my degree in country X and working my way from there but the odds are that I will *have* to do this in Y. How do I proceed? I intend on going into physics or applied maths and perhaps, do a one year masters in stats or CS in Europe.

Just wanted to know. I want to start making some $$ asap while doing something intellectually stimulating. I think it's good to have a rough idea of what is feasible before I get into anything.

Note that country X could actually be anywhere the jobs are. I have no problem with moving to Tombouctou, if I have to. Could be an interesting adventure.

Cheers
 
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  • #2
Find somebody that knows someone in that country that can get you a job. Honestly I don't see how anyone would answer your question - many jobs require a language you might not know. Others might be running at 30% unemployment and have no reason to hire a foreigner. You've only listed vague statements about what you are trying to accomplish.
 
  • #3
fss said:
Find somebody that knows someone in that country that can get you a job. Honestly I don't see how anyone would answer your question - many jobs require a language you might not know. Others might be running at 30% unemployment and have no reason to hire a foreigner. You've only listed vague statements about what you are trying to accomplish.

I wanted to know if getting some kind of job doing math or cs-like with a master's degree only was possible. If it is now, assuming immigration laws and such don't change 4-5 years from now, well, it should be then.

Could be anywhere: France, North America, England, Australia, New Zealand, I don't care. I speak French/English.

The original plan was to go all the way to a PhD but I don't think I'd want to stay in that environment for that long and I think starting to make some money earlier would be better.
 
  • #4
I did an internship abroad (not 15, but 8 hours away)
I think I might have been lucky to get it though.
I found an interesting internship offer, applied the same way like I'd do in my country and quickly got it. It was interesting for them to get a student from abroad and as long as you speak English everything will be fine! I live in Europe and I can tell you that you won't have a language problem in almost any European country.
So I'd suggest to proceed like this: pick a country you like -> use Google to find out about jobs in the physics sector in that country (every country has some kind of physics society where you'll find that information) -> email the employer -> book a flight ticket
 
  • #5
Mépris said:
The original plan was to go all the way to a PhD but I don't think I'd want to stay in that environment for that long and I think starting to make some money earlier would be better.

Something that will help is if you finish your Ph.D. Having a Ph.D. gets you in front of the immigration queue.

Also something that will help a lot is if you go to school in country X.
 

Related to Getting a Job Abroad: Tips & Advice for Finding Employment in Other Countries

1. How do I find job opportunities in other countries?

One of the best ways to find job opportunities in other countries is to use online job search engines and websites specific to the country you are interested in. You can also network with professionals in your field who have experience working abroad and reach out to international companies directly.

2. What skills and qualifications are necessary to work abroad?

This will depend on the specific job and country you are interested in. Generally, having a strong education and relevant work experience in your field will be beneficial. Fluency in the local language may also be required for some positions.

3. How can I make my resume stand out to international employers?

It is important to tailor your resume to the specific job and country you are applying for. Highlight any relevant international experience and language fluency. Be sure to also showcase any transferable skills, such as adaptability and cultural awareness.

4. What are some challenges I may face when working abroad?

Some common challenges may include adapting to a new culture, language barriers, and obtaining necessary work permits and visas. It is important to research and prepare for these challenges before accepting a job abroad.

5. How can I prepare for a job interview in another country?

Researching the cultural norms and customs of the country where the job is located is crucial. It is also important to practice common interview questions and be prepared to discuss your qualifications and why you are interested in working abroad. If possible, try to conduct a mock interview with someone who has experience working in that country.

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