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Graviational effect of quarks and strong force

  1. Dec 4, 2003 #1
    with intense gravity the strong force between quarks are weakened. would it be possible that under extreme gravitational effects that quarks from other atoms join to make the theoretical tetraquark?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Dec 5, 2003 #2

    chroot

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    Can you back this statement up with some evidence?

    - Warren
     
  4. Dec 5, 2003 #3
    the strong force

    sorry but i meant to say it is the weak force that is weakened

    source of fact:

    the illustrated history of time by stephen hawking (updated and expanded version)
     
  5. Dec 5, 2003 #4

    chroot

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    Re: the strong force

    Please quote the relevant passage.

    - Warren
     
  6. Dec 7, 2003 #5
    the relevant message

    the strong force is weakened with particles with increased energy for example in particle accelerators, big bang.

    quoted exactly from

    The illustrated a brief history of time by stephen hawking (updated and expanded edition)

    including:
    particles with high energy have increased mass for example in big bang and in high ggravitational objects (black holes)

    quoted exactly from

    Time (by someone i cant remember)
     
    Last edited: Dec 7, 2003
  7. Dec 8, 2003 #6
    I see no connection there, just a statement that high-energy particles have an increased mass. And that is only true when observing the particle from another frame of reference; if you were moving with the particle, it would not appear to you to have an increased mass.

    The strong force does not yet show any sign of being affected by increased mass or gravity. I have some experience with particle acceleration myself, namely with Fermilab data. Particle acceleration does not weaken the strong force, as I believe you are trying to infer from the said statement, but rather is a probe for studying it.

    Gravity of any valid strength should have little or no bearing on the formation of tetraquarks. X(3872), as it is called, is confined by its wave-function, not by gravity.

    Either elaborate more on your idea, or quote more of the said passage from Hawking word for word so that we can get an idea of the context. And remember, Hawking is a theorist, not an experimentalist.
     
  8. Dec 8, 2003 #7
    Re: the relevant message

    It seems to me that this is referring to the asymptotic freedom of quantum chromodynamics, in which the coupling constant runs to zero at high energies.
     
  9. Dec 8, 2003 #8
    All of the coupling constants do the same thing at higher energies. They never actually seem to have a point where they will reach zero, though. As is, it seems that we cannot even get the strong constant to drop below 0.1 at energies nearing 200 TeV. The principle of asymptotic freedom continues to hold at the center-of-mass, as well, and the confinement of quarks can only be violated enough to generate a quark-gluon plasma (QGP) at best; still somewhat confined, just many more degrees of freedom.
     
  10. Dec 16, 2003 #9

    chroot

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    Moderator note: I split TornadoCreator's post off to the theory development forum.

    - Warren
     
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