Heat transfer coefficient and ζ

  • Thread starter PeterH
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  • #1
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Main Question or Discussion Point

How do I find the heat transfer coefficient for a meteorite?
The meteorite is made of carboneus chondrite, but approximations with heat transfer coefficients for regular stones or rocky materials would be just as fine.

Furthermore, how would I calculate the energy required to vaporize 1 g of meteoric material, if the meteor had an initial temperature of 200 K? I haven't been able to find anything about at with temperature stones would evaporate (or if it's even possible for them to?) or their specific heat of vaporization.

This is what I know:
  • Stony meteorite, specific heat: c_sm = 1.2 * 10^3 J kg^-1 K^-1
  • Stony meteorite, thermal conductivity: k_sm = 2.0 W m^-1 K^-1
  • Stony meteorite, density: p_sm = 3.3 * 10^3 kg m^-3
  • Stony meteorite, melting point: T_sm = 1.7 * 10^3 K
  • Stony meteorite, specific melting heat: L_sm =2.6 * 10^5 J kg^-1
Any help would be greatly appreciated!
 

Answers and Replies

  • #2
CWatters
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I'm in a rush to go out but google found..

http://arxiv.org/pdf/1302.3666.pdf

For the thermodynamic properties
of μMETs we adopt values used in Bronshten (1983)
and Love & Brownlee (1991) for stony meteoroids: c = 103
J/(kg K) is the μMET specific heat, Hevap = 6.05 × 10^6
J/kg is the latent heat of vaporization.
 
  • #3
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Thanks! Just what I needed.
 
  • #4
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Possibly Google the word ablation.
 
  • #5
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