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Helicopter parents

  1. Sep 14, 2006 #1

    J77

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    Parents meddling in student life

    http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/education/4777053.stm

    It's likely to be a new phenomena in the UK since the introduction of fees - and a lot of parents paying for their kids to go to uni.

    For you US people, is it a common practice, if a parent pays for their kid's education, that they want to know the ins and outs of it and the uni set-up?

    From a personal point of view, I don't like it.

    I didn't like the introduction of fees, not only because of the financial burden that people from poorer backgrounds would find hard to bear but also because of stuff like this.
    Parents and kids expecting something extra because they're paying some money.

    I hope it doesn't turn universities into factories, where kids are taught stuff to pass exams - like schools are turning into. Universities should be about finding ones own path in a given subject - even if the weak students fail - not about paying for a degree.
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Sep 14, 2006 #2
    I've seen this happen at my school. At the school's orientation for first year students, when asked what the student will be majoring in, the parents typical response is "We're majoring in ...".
     
  4. Sep 14, 2006 #3
    Of course. If parents pay out $130,000 in tuition for their kid's education they're going to want to know what's going on. And even if there's a scholarship or such and the parent's don't pay, the competition is strong enough that the parents want to make sure that their kid is getting a good education where they are.

    Personally, I don't see what's so wrong about it. Sure there are a few extreme cases/horror stories of parents getting too involved, but for the most part, it's the school's problem with the "helicopter" part, not the parent's.

    FYI, my parents don't get involved with my academics/classes at all, really. I handle most of everything myself.
     
  5. Sep 14, 2006 #4

    chroot

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    There are good parents, and there are bad parents. Paying a fee doesn't necessarily turn one into the other.

    - Warren
     
  6. Sep 14, 2006 #5

    JasonRox

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    Good point.

    Also, I agree with schools simply becoming factories.
     
  7. Sep 15, 2006 #6
    I think it would be wise to chime in here that american universities have been requireing fees since their inception. With a top grade school costing around 30-50 thousand dollars for tuition alone (not including room and board)

    So quit your belly-aching about having to pay for school
     
  8. Sep 15, 2006 #7

    JasonRox

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    Um... he lives in a different country. He's probably paying a good amount of taxes to take care of that.

    Unfortunately, Americans get something other than education with their tax money. If we took that away from you (whatever that may be), you'd be complaining about it and then he or I, would tell you that we've been paying since the begging so stop complaining.

    It's not as simple as saying stop complaining. We pay for it already.
     
  9. Sep 15, 2006 #8

    chroot

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    Yeah, right. In the taxes thread the first two Canadians, including you, claimed they were paying only about 22% tax. I live in the US, and I pay almost double that -- and I still don't have free schooling or healthcare.

    - Warren
     
  10. Sep 15, 2006 #9
    darn billion dollar a day defense budget
    that last bit was a joke.
    [/threadhijack]

    but the opening post asked if it was common for american parents to interfere in their childrens education if they were paying for it, and I was trying to point out that in america everyone's parents put in some amount of money for school. and thus that doesn't contribute to helicopter parenting in american schools, the big tihng that does contribute to it though is that in america there is definatly a perception that everyone should go to college, and if you don't then your somehow inferior. Beyond that its somehow percieved that if you don't get into a good school then your going to be a failure in life. Its that pressure (which primarily comes from the parents) that leads to helicopter parenting.
     
  11. Sep 15, 2006 #10

    JasonRox

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    Um... that's only Federal Tax. That's not including Provincial and Municipal taxes.

    Um... I'm also in the LOWEST tax bracket.

    Also, a student too.

    People normally pay 40-50% if you make a good wage.
     
  12. Sep 17, 2006 #11
    We're aware that the tax bracket you're in IS NOT THE AMOUNT OF TAX YOU PAY, right?

    The top tax rate in the UK is (I believe) 44%, but the total tax proportion scales to a maximum of about 35% at an income of £50,000. When people talk about their tax brackets, it becomes extremely misleading. In other words, I find it very hard to believe that rich Canadians give up 50% of their income to the government.
     
  13. Sep 17, 2006 #12
    That's essentially what happens in Australia (well, 49% or so). There are ways around it, of course, but basic income tax is at 49 cents in the dollar for the top bracket. That doesn't include fringe benefits tax, capital gains, GST...admittedly, for this we get a two-tier educational system in which the government pays about half of most people's "tuition" fees and provides an interest-free loan for the rest of the money, with a minority of students paying full fees upfront. We also get decent free health services. ;)

    Back on topic, it does happen here quite a bit because the educational system is set up differently to the US. Most people here don't move into dorms or move interstate for universities; a very large number continue living with their parents or find shared accommodation nearby their university, remaining at a close distance to their parents instead of moving to a different city. Many unis here have parent information nights for prospective students, but encourage the idea that they have to "let go" a bit and allow their kids to be independent.
     
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